A History of Trade Unionism in the United States

By Selig Perlman | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

The first seven chapters of the present work are based on the History of Labour in the United States by John R. Com mons and Associates,1 published in 1918 in two volumes by the Macmillan Company, New York. The major portion of the latter was in turn based on A Documentary History of the American Industrial Society, edited by Professor Com mons and published in 1910 in ten volumes by Clark and Company, Cleveland. In preparing chapters 8 to 11, dealing with the period since 1897, which is not covered in the History of Labour, the author used largely the same sort of material as that in the preparation of the above named works; namely, original sources such as proceedings of trade union conventions, labor and employer papers, government reports, etc. There are, however, many excellent special histories relating to the recent period in the labor movement, especially histories of unionism in individual trades or industries, to which the author wishes to refer the reader for more ample accounts of the several phases of the subject, which he himself was of necessity obliged to treat but briefly. The following is a selected list of such works together with some others relating to earlier periods:

BARNETT, GEORGE E., The Printers—A Study in American Trade Unionism, American Economic Association, 1909.

BING, ALEXANDER M., War-Time Strikes and their Adjustment, Dutton and Co., 1921.

BONNETT, CLARENCE E., Employers' Associations in the United States, Macmillan, 1922.

BRISSENDEN, PAUL F., The I. W. W.—A Study in American Syndicalism, Columbia University, 1920.

BROOKS, JOHN G., American Syndicalism: The I. W. W., Macmillan, 1913.

BUDISH AND SOULE, The New Unionism in the Clothing Industry, Harcourt, 1920.

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1
See Author's Preface.

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