5
Handmade in Spain: The Culture of
Guitar Making
Kevin Dawe with Moira Dawe

In this chapter we aim to reveal some of the forces converging upon and mechanisms operating within the world of guitar making in Spain. Local discourses of identity and authenticity emerge in the distinctly‘between-worlds’ setting of the guitar workshop, this local world made all the more distinctive though a poetics of place and a politics of craftsmanship. In these discourses‘here’, rather than ‘there’, is‘better’; whilst‘better’ is‘made by hand’ rather than‘madeby machine’. This quite specific case of‘the global’ being apprehended by‘the local’ shows that workshops are not places where guitar makers exist in splendid isolation; rather, their lives and works must be seen as having a dynamic relationship with the outside world and viewed within particular social and cultural settings.

Clearly, within the dimensions of Arjun Appadurai's‘global cultural economy’ a set of fluid and overlapping landscapes - ethnoscapes, mediascapes, technoscapes, fmanscapes and ideoscapes - converge upon and interact with the guitarscape of the workshop in quite specific and subtle ways. 1 This merging of -scapes comes in many forms, from the rising prices of timber to the fluctuating interest in the classical guitar, from the ways in which global tourism enters into the workshop to the dialogue between small workshop owners and internationally acclaimed guitarists. However, guitar makers also inhabit a world formed out of a unique intersection of material, social and cultural worlds. In this musical habitus (this nexus of practices, structures and structuring forces, Bourdieu 1977), these musical artisans function not merely as makers of cultural artifacts, but as agents setting a variety of social practices in motion. Lives and livelihoods are literally built around the guitar and the guitar workshop.

Guitar makers are in a position of power and authority, and are custodians of the knowledge that brings the guitar to life. So we consider guitar making as the basis for the construction of cultural difference in Spain in the manner that we consider other aspects of Spanish guitar culture. We use this material to emphasize the importance of the guitar in Spanish culture as a whole, especially as a site for a range of social and cultural exchanges. For instance, the Cordoba International Guitar Festival epitomizes a convergence of‘the local’ and‘the global’, the meeting

-63-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Guitar Cultures
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Notes on Contributors ix
  • 1 - Introduction: Guitars, Cultures, People and Places 1
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 2 - The Guitar in the Blues Music of the Deep South 11
  • Notes 25
  • References *
  • 3 - Unplugged: Blues Guitarists and the Myth of Acousticity 27
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 4 - ‘plug in and Play!’ Uk‘indie-Guitar’ Culture 45
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 5 - Handmade in Spain: the Culture of Guitar Making 63
  • Notes 82
  • References *
  • 6 - The Guitar as Artifact and Icon: Identity Formation in the Babyboom Generation 89
  • Notes 113
  • References *
  • 7 - Into the Arena: Edward Van Halen and the Cultural Contradictions of the Guitar Hero 117
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 7 - The Guitar Cultures of Papua New Guinea: Regional, Social and Stylistic Diversity 135
  • Notes 154
  • References *
  • 9 - Hybridity and Segragation in the Guitar Cultures of Brazil 157
  • Notes 174
  • References *
  • 10 - Rock to Raga: the Many Lives of the Indian Guitar 179
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Index 209
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 215

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.