Notes
1
Acknowledgments: We wish to thank Karen Campbell, Alan Greenwood, Paul Kotapish, Dan Miller, and Jon Weisberger for the information they provided and to thank Claire Peterson for her editorial assistance. Among those who have shared with us their experience with the guitar we especially want to thank Chet Atkins, Scott Baretta, Andy Bennett, William Bielby, Scott Bills, Harold Bradley, Robert Burnett, Jeff Burroughs, John Corner, Don Cusic, Paul DiMaggio, Terry Fain, Bruce Feiler, Danny Finley, Aidan Foster-Carter, Patricia Francis, David Goodman, John Johns, Dave Laing, James McCobbin, Jan Murdoch, Brian Murphy, Keith Negus, David Pankratz, Ruth Peterson, Keith Roe, Neil Rosenberg, Todd Russell, Rick Shields, Mats Trondman, and Charles Wolfe.
2
In the early years of the twentieth century before the advent of the phonograph, the piano had been widely played by young people.
3
A pep-rally is an attempt, through songs and chants, by fans and cheerleaders to invoke the necessary spirit to spur their team to victory.
4
In contrast, country music artists coming up before the Second World War often talk of being taught the guitar by an older female relative. Back then the macho instrument was the fiddle. In Bill Monroe's family, as in many others, the oldest brother got to play fiddle (Peterson 1997).
5
The guitar was of course central in the blues and in country music by the 1930s when Jimmie Rodgers, Gene Autry, and Roy Rogers gave it greater national visibility. The hit jazz offerings of Django Reinhardt and Charlie Christian came before mid-century but as one soloist among several others, and neither led a group on a charted record (Whitburn 1986).
6
The categories used in the two data sets are the same, and the American Music Conference is an umbrella organization of music industry trade associations including the National Association of Music Merchants. In addition, the NAMM provided both data sets, so we take these two data series on instrument sales to be comparable.
7
‘Drums sold’ increased from 9,000 in 1958 to a high of 60,000 in 1966 and fell to 41,856 in 1972. These figures are not included in our discussion because it is notoriously difficult to interpret the meaning of these figures. In practice, ‘drums sold’ sometimes refers to the sale of a complete drum kit or to one of its numerous components.
8
NAMM reports that 252,360 brass instruments, 382,730 woodwind instruments, 106,759 pianos, and 93,950 drum kits were shipped to US distributors in 1998. Guitar units outnumbered all of these instruments combined (NAMM 1999).
9
Of course, the designation vintage guitar is subjective and doesn't always neatly fit our categories. For example, a 1948 $4 Sears and Roebuch‘Roy Rogers’

-113-

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Guitar Cultures
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Notes on Contributors ix
  • 1 - Introduction: Guitars, Cultures, People and Places 1
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 2 - The Guitar in the Blues Music of the Deep South 11
  • Notes 25
  • References *
  • 3 - Unplugged: Blues Guitarists and the Myth of Acousticity 27
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 4 - ‘plug in and Play!’ Uk‘indie-Guitar’ Culture 45
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 5 - Handmade in Spain: the Culture of Guitar Making 63
  • Notes 82
  • References *
  • 6 - The Guitar as Artifact and Icon: Identity Formation in the Babyboom Generation 89
  • Notes 113
  • References *
  • 7 - Into the Arena: Edward Van Halen and the Cultural Contradictions of the Guitar Hero 117
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 7 - The Guitar Cultures of Papua New Guinea: Regional, Social and Stylistic Diversity 135
  • Notes 154
  • References *
  • 9 - Hybridity and Segragation in the Guitar Cultures of Brazil 157
  • Notes 174
  • References *
  • 10 - Rock to Raga: the Many Lives of the Indian Guitar 179
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Index 209
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