Restoring Tourism Destinations in Crisis: A Strategic Marketing Approach

By David Beirman | Go to book overview

9
BRITAIN: FOOT-AND-MOUTH
DISEASE, 2001

Restoring confidence through information dissemination

CRISIS RANKING: DESTCON 3


BACKGROUND

Great Britain is one of the world's leading tourist destinations. In 2000, some 25.2 million people visited the United Kingdom from all over the world, spending a total of £12.5 billion or US$19 billion. 1 Britain is ranked fifth in the world for tourist earnings after the United States, Italy, France and Spain. Britain's proximity to Continental Europe makes it ideal for many long-haul travellers to combine a visit to Britain with travel to European countries.

The United Kingdom's rich cultural history is a major attraction: the Kings and Queens of Britain, representing 1000 years of monarchy; pomp and circumstance; Buckingham Palace; the Last Night of the Proms at the Royal Albert Hall; the land of Shakespeare and the enduring tradition of British theatre; pop music; fashion; fish and chips. The outstanding universities Oxford and Cambridge, the British Museum and the National Art Gallery represent a small selection of Britain's cultural icons. In the field of sport, Britain is home to the world football code of soccer as well as rugby, football and cricket. Tourists are attracted to British institutions ranging from the pub—social centre for working-class Britons—to the clubs and societies of the professional, academic and social elites. Whereas trappings of the British class system often give rise to domestic discord, they fascinate foreign visitors. The brief

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