Restoring Tourism Destinations in Crisis: A Strategic Marketing Approach

By David Beirman | Go to book overview

11
AUSTRALIA: PORT ARTHUR
MASSACRE, 1996

Tourism Tasmania's response to an aberrant crisis

CRISIS RANKING: DESTCON 3


BACKGROUND

Two-thirds of mainland Australia is desert or semi-desert, but located due south of the continent lies the verdant island state of Tasmania. The visually dramatic, wild and almost uninhabited, mountainous southwest region is an important World Heritage site and one of the largest temperate wilderness areas on Earth. The alpine areas in central Tasmania boast some of the most spectacular scenery in Australia, with high ramparts, glacial lakes, massive waterfalls and rushing rivers not unlike the highlands of Scotland. Tasmania has flora and fauna which are unique to the state, including the Huon Pine and a carnivorous marsupial, the famous Tasmanian Devil. Adventurers still seek the Tasmanian Tiger (Thylacine), officially declared extinct since 1937. The capital city of Hobart, located on the Derwent River, is Australia's second oldest city and its oldest buildings are of English Georgian style. The eastern half of Tasmania is a land of cultivated rolling hills with many small villages, rich farmland and a scenic coastline. By Australian standards, Tasmania is small, easy to traverse and unusually varied. It is well suited to a driving holiday and the most popular tourism packages are car hire/accommodation combinations or campervan holidays. Unlike most mainland Australian states, which require travelling long distances between points of interest, the scenic highlights of Tasmania can be experienced within a week.

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