Restoring Tourism Destinations in Crisis: A Strategic Marketing Approach

By David Beirman | Go to book overview

12
CROATIA: THE CROATIA-YUGOSLAV
WAR, 1991–95

Post-war recovery and tourism development

CRISIS RANKING: DESTCON 2


BACKGROUND

As a tourist destination, Croatia has been blessed by some of the most dramatic coastal scenery in Europe. Croatia's walled city of Dubrovnik is considered by many to be one of the most beautiful Renaissance cities in Europe, rivalling Venice in its historical, cultural and economic influence. Of all the Balkan countries, Croatia has the longest Adriatic coastline and its coastal area includes around 1000 islands, 69 of which are inhabited. Croatia's Dalmatian coast has a long history of attracting tourists from all over Europe, and was for centuries regarded as a playground of the European aristocracy. Its Adriatic resorts have made it the most popular tourist destination in the Balkans, easily accessible by road, air and sea from all parts of Europe. The country's scenic attractions are enhanced by the fact that, by European standards, accommodation, food and tourist services are relatively inexpensive. Croatia's inland capital of Zagreb is one of Europe's most attractive capital cities, located in the heart of a country with many historical treasures and diverse scenery.

Croatia has been cursed by a turbulent history and a long-standing enmity between its predominantly Catholic population, the Orthodox population of neighbouring Serbia, and Muslim-dominated Bosnia Herzegovina. Croatia has been a powerful state within the Balkan region and a reluctant state within the former Yugoslav Federation which, between 1945 and 1980, was ruled with

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