How Safe Are Our Skies? Assessing the Airlines' Response to Terrorism

By Rodney Wallis | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5

Airline Security

Just as ICAO publishes a model security program for international airports, so too does it issue a security framework for airline operators. It is part of a series of such outlines that range from guidelines for a National Civil Aviation Security Program to Certification of Screening Personnel. ICAO recommendations have relevance to any country with a civil aviation operation. They have been developed with input from the major civil aviation authorities from around the world and from the industry’s trade associations (airlines, airports, and pilots). But an airline’s approach to security, though based on ICAO guidelines, will vary according to the carrier’s perception of the threat it faces and the regulations mandated by its own government. The degree of the threat will clearly affect the content of an airline’s program. Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) and Air India, for example, operate against a national and regional background of unrest. Militants seeking independence from India have struck at aviation targets in the past. Pakistan is a country beset with agitators, and street murder is rife. As 2002 opened, Pakistan and India were again threatening to go to war against each other. Both have a nuclear arsenal. Security appropriate for Cathy Pacific or Japan Airlines would certainly be inadequate for either PIA or Air India. A U.S. carrier flying in the Middle East will have security requirements very

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