Australian Urban Planning: New Challenges, New Agendas

By Brendan Gleeson; Nicholas Low | Go to book overview

Glossary

These definitions are for technical terms used in the text. The terms appear in boldface at their first mention in the book and we have indicated at the end of each definition the chapter in which the term first appears.

Assimilation The attempt to make newcomers to a country conform to some idea of normal behaviour in that country. The imposition of a supposedly universal set of values to govern social behaviour. Thus in the 1950s migrants to Australia were expected to see themselves as ‘Australians’, conforming to norms which had developed in the predominantly Anglo-Celtic culture of a British colony. (Chapter 3)

Cold War The period from shortly after the end of World War II (1945) until approximately the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, when America and the Soviet Union vied for military supremacy in many local theatres of politics (Europe, Africa, Indochina, Latin America) but without direct military confrontation—or ‘hot’ war—between America and the Soviet Union. The ‘arms race’ between the two ‘superpowers’ to develop the most destructive nuclear capacity was accompanied by the ‘Truman doctrine’ (after the American president) of containment of the vast Soviet empire, and the establishment of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Alliance) in the West and the Warsaw Pact, which cemented the military alliance of the Eastern bloc. (Chapter 6)

Fast-tracking An application for approval for development of land and/or buildings normally has to go through a process of examination under the relevant regulations. The process may involve public review and appeal, which can take a considerable time. In order to encourage development of particular large-scale projects, the normal process may

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