Self-Defense and Battered Women Who Kill: A New Framework

By Robbin S. Ogle; Susan Jacobs | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Any authors who have written a book will likely tell you that they can not possibly thank everyone who made a contribution to their research, developmental thinking, or final product. However, we would like to thank those who made major contributions and without whose assistance this book would never have come to fruition. First, we must thank Sheila Beasley for being willing to share her ordeal and some of the most difficult moments in her life. We hope that we have done justice to her story and that its use will be of assistance to others facing the same ordeal in the future. We also must thank Nancy Gore for her support, friendship, excellent input on the topic, and tremendous editing skills. Without her assistance we believe this book would never have been useful to others. We are also grateful to Alissa Lauer and Clifford Lee who assisted enormously with the collection and organization of case law. Any errors in analysis are those of the authors and should not be attributed to them. Our thanks also go to Heather Staines at Greenwood Publishing Group for her patience and efforts on our behalf. Chapter 6 of this book is an experimental chapter where the new theory is applied to gay and lesbian battering homicide. This chapter would not have been possible without the knowledge of the literature and efforts of Anne Garner. Our thanks go out to her for her willingness to help write a chapter in this book. We want to thank Whitney L.Shockley and Christian A.Nolasco for their graphics skills resulting in the wonderful illustrations in the text. Finally, we

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