Self-Defense and Battered Women Who Kill: A New Framework

By Robbin S. Ogle; Susan Jacobs | Go to book overview

not be used to examine a long-term or “mega” interaction involving multiple incidents in a process. We believe that battering represents a long-term interaction where neither party sees a predictable end to the interaction and must respond to each succeeding incident based upon knowledge developed in previous incidents during this interaction. Interaction process theory and borrowed bits and pieces from the Ogle et al. (1995) theory of homicidal behavior among women form the internal or micro-level explanation of battering and battering escalation to homicide in this new theory. Ogle et al. (1995) discuss the significance of socialization of women against the use of aggression, the higher stress level of women, the lower number of coping resources possessed by women, how stress causes high chronic arousal and negative affect, and the response of normal persons to negative affect (use of coping resources to manage or end the negative feelings and strain they create). We utilize these ideas in our new theory to explain the context of the battering interaction, how it progresses, and how it escalates to lethal levels. In this respect, if battering can be seen as a long-term interaction involving multiple incidents with escalating levels of violence, it can be understood as a homicidal process requiring the victim to learn from each incident in the interaction and utilize that knowledge to survive as the interaction progresses. This allows us to argue that battered women who kill must be able to present a self-defense explanation that includes this context of the long-term interaction process rather than a single snapshot of the final incident resulting in homicide.


REFERENCES

Adams, D., J.Jackson, and M.Lauby (1988). Family violence research: Aid or obstacle to the battered women’s movement. Response,11, 14–16.

Aldarondo, E., and M.A.Straus (1994). Screening for physical violence in couple therapy: Methodological, practical, and ethical considerations. Family Process,33, 425–439.

Aldarondo, E., and D.B.Sugarman (1996). Risk marker analysis of the cessation and persistence of wife assault. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology,64(5), 1010–1019.

Allen, N.H. (1983). Homicide followed by suicide: Los Angeles, 1970–1979. Suicide and Life Threatening Behavior,13(3), 155–165.

Angel, M. (1996). Criminal law and women: Giving the abused woman who kills “a jury of her peers” who appreciate trifles. American Criminal Law Review,33(3), 229–348.

Bachman, R. and L.E.Saltzman (1994). Violence against women: A national crime victimization survey report (NIJ 154348). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice.

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Self-Defense and Battered Women Who Kill: A New Framework
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 213

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.