Updike: America's Man of Letters

By William H. Pritchard | Go to book overview

TEN
RABBIT RETIRED

A previous chapter, "Extravagant Fictions," which surveyed Updike's novels over the ten years from 1978 ( The Coup) to 1988 (S), notably omitted his longest and happiest — certainly his most celebrated — work from that period, Rabbit Is Rich ( 1981). The third volume in what would be the Angstrom tetralogy won all three of the big literary prizes for that year — the Pulitzer, the National (then called American) Book Award, and the National Book Critics' Circle; it also received the most unanimously approving critical response of any book Updike had published. Treating it here with its successor, Rabbit at Rest ( 1990), makes sense inasmuch as the two books are continuous, stylistically and tonally, in ways that distinguish them from both Rabbit, Run and Rabbit Redux. Their mood is comic-elegiac, their technique an extension of the "documentary" realism seen in Updike's earlier fiction, and their treatment of American society and culture — no longer the heated, contested, and overtly dangerous society it was in Rabbit Redux — is resigned and accepting, if ironically so. A lot of time seems to have passed, and suddenly it is too late to do much, if anything, about either society in the large or the individual life of one of its aging citizens. Rabbit rich and at rest: the words carry with them, when played out in the action of the novels, an acquiescent, helpless complicity with the world's ways and with human limitation generally.

-277-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Updike: America's Man of Letters
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Chronology xi
  • Intorduction the Man of Letters 1
  • One - First Fruits 17
  • Two - The Novelist Takes off 45
  • Three - The Pennsylvania Thing 63
  • Four - Adultery and Its Consequences 117
  • Five - Impersonations of Men in Trouble (1) 145
  • Six - Impersonations of Men in Trouble (ii) 169
  • Seven - Extravagant Flctions 195
  • Eight - The Critic and Reviewer 229
  • Nine - Poet, Memoirist 253
  • Ten - Rabbit Retired 277
  • Eleven - Post-Rabbit Effects 301
  • Notes 333
  • Bibliography 339
  • Index 343
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 351

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.