Hope and History: Why We Must Share the Story of the Movement

By Vincent Harding | Go to book overview

12
Letters to Teachers in Religious
Communities and Institutions

Dear Friends,

Although the essays in this book are addressed to teachers of every kind, located in a broad variety of settings, there was no way that I could complete the work without sharing some very specific expressions of memory, hope, and concern with those of you who are teaching in religious and other spiritually grounded situations.

As I reflect on why I am moved to close out this endeavor with a word to you, it seems to me that at least one of the obvious motivations is firmly embedded in my own most personal history. In addition to my mother, who was constantly teaching and encouraging, the first teachers I remember were in the little Harlem church when so much of my early life, vision, and commitment was nurtured. So my movement toward you in your synagogues and mosques, in your churches, temples, and dharma retreats, in your storefronts and basilicas, is a natural one, shaped by many early habits of the heart.

But far more than the force of habit and the call of memories are at work here, friends. I come naturally to a closing in your company because so many of the seminal issues in this sacred history of African-American transformative struggle are familiar to you, beginning with the idea of a "saving history" itself.

I am drawn to you, because you have been constantly teaching in words and actions the connections between convictions and

-201-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hope and History: Why We Must Share the Story of the Movement
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction - Moving beyond the Boundaries 1
  • 1 - Signs . . . Signs . . . Turn Visible Again 13
  • 2 - Advanced Ideas about Democracy 26
  • 3 - More Power Than We Know 56
  • 4 - Fighting for Freedom with Church Fans 75
  • 5 - God's Appeal to This Age" 91
  • 6 - Gifts of the Black Movement 105
  • 7 - Poets, Musicians, and Magicians 126
  • 8 - Doing the Right Thing in Mississippi and Brooklyn 154
  • 9 - In Search of the World 166
  • 10 - Is America Possible? 177
  • 11 - One Final, Soaring Hope 190
  • 12 - Letters to Teachers in Religious Communities and Institutions 201
  • Acknowledgments 229
  • Notes 235
  • Index of Names and Titles 245
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 249

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.