Hope and History: Why We Must Share the Story of the Movement

By Vincent Harding | Go to book overview

About the Author

VINCENT HARDING is a native of New York City and holds an M.A. and a Ph.D. in History from the University of Chicago. From 1961 to 1964, he and his wife, Rosemarie Freeney Harding, worked in various capacities as full-time teachers, activists, and negotiators in the southern freedom movement. They were friends and co-workers with Martin Luther King, Jr., and many other movement leaders. In 1968, after several years as Chairman of the History and Sociology Department at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, he became the Director of the Martin Luther King Memorial Center, and Chairman of the nationally televised Black Heritage series. Harding was one of the organizers and first director of the Institute of the Black World founded in 1969 in Atlanta. After several research positions and visiting professorships, Harding has been Professor of Religion and Social Transformation at the Iliff School of Theology on the University of Denver campus since 1981. He has lectured widely in this country and overseas on history, literature, and contemporary issues.

With his family, he has been active in various movements for peace and justice. He and Rosemarie conduct workshops and lead retreats on the connections between personal spirituality and social responsibility. Recently he has served as senior adviser to the PBS television series, Eyes on the Prize:America's Civil Rights Years.

Harding's essays, articles, and poetry have been published in books, journals, and newspapers. Two of his most recent books are: The Other American Revolution, and There is a River (the first in a three-volume history on the struggle for Black freedom in the United States). The Hardings have two children, Rachel and Jonathan DuBois.

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Hope and History: Why We Must Share the Story of the Movement
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction - Moving beyond the Boundaries 1
  • 1 - Signs . . . Signs . . . Turn Visible Again 13
  • 2 - Advanced Ideas about Democracy 26
  • 3 - More Power Than We Know 56
  • 4 - Fighting for Freedom with Church Fans 75
  • 5 - God's Appeal to This Age" 91
  • 6 - Gifts of the Black Movement 105
  • 7 - Poets, Musicians, and Magicians 126
  • 8 - Doing the Right Thing in Mississippi and Brooklyn 154
  • 9 - In Search of the World 166
  • 10 - Is America Possible? 177
  • 11 - One Final, Soaring Hope 190
  • 12 - Letters to Teachers in Religious Communities and Institutions 201
  • Acknowledgments 229
  • Notes 235
  • Index of Names and Titles 245
  • About the Author *
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