Indians in the United States and Canada: A Comparative History

By Roger L. Nichols | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1
For a careful discussion of this use of the term frontier see Lamar and Thompson, The Frontier in History, 3-13; and Wilbur R. Jacobs, "The Fatal Confrontation:"Early Native- White Relations on the Frontiers of Australia, New Guinea, and America: A Comparative Study, Pacific Historical Review 40 ( August 1971): 283-309.
2
W. Turrentine Jackson, "A Brief Message for the Young and/or Ambitious:"Comparable Frontiers as a Field for Investigation, Western Historical Quarterly 9 ( January 1978): 5-18; Deloria, Custer Died for Your Sins; and Cardinal, The Unjust Society.
3
One example for each country offers a glimpse of the bulk of the literature. In the United States, the University of Oklahoma Press's Civilization of the American Indian series includes well over 150 titles, with new ones being added regularly. The volume of Canadian scholarship may be seen from Alber and Weaver's A Canadian Indian Bibliography, 1960- 1970, which for that single decade lists 3,082 items. In both countries, the volume of both popular and scholarly literature on Native American issues continues to rise dramatically.

I. INDIANS MEET THE SPANISH, FRENCH, AND DUTCH, 15131701
1
Trigger, Natives and Newcomers, and Weber, Spanish Frontier, both give broad accounts of the colonial era, and I use them heavily in this chapter.
2
The most accessible sources for these generalization include chapters 2-3 in Wilcomb E. Washburn , The Indian in America ( New York: Harper & Row, 1975); chapters 2-4 in Dickason, Canada's First Nations; and Alice B. Kehoe, North American Indians:A Comprehensive Account, 2d ed. (Englewood Cliffs nj: Prentice Hall, 1992).
3
Weber, Spanish Frontier, 33-55.
4
Cartier, Voyages, 51.

-325-

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