Deliver Us from Evil: An Interpretation of American Prohibition

By Norman H. Clark | Go to book overview

8
Resistance
and
Social Change

some intriguing legends to the contrary, the beginnings of Prohibition did not seem so grim. Several states had been dry for six years, several others for more than a decade. Citizens of some regions had taken a local option before the turn of the century, and to them the Volstead Act was only a belated confirmation by the national government of their early wisdom. When the war sublimated the movement for social purity into the moral equivalent of patriotism and national defense, it swept away the worst of the old-time debaucheries in prostitution and gambling, and with them the worst of the old-time saloons. Only a few people regretted the passing. William Randolph Hearst, who often thought he knew what was best for Americans, signed an editorial in 1919 praising the 18th Amendment because it would abolish "half the misery of half the people." Liquor, he wrote, "had destroyed more each year than the World War destroyed." Possessed still by the passions of national glory and unity, he concluded that "the suppression of the drink traffic is an expression of the higher morality upon which we are now entering."

This expression began with the closing of saloons and barrooms at midnight, January 16, 1920. (Should a barroom continue illegally as a "speakeasy" thereafter, the entire building in which it operated might, like a bordello, be declared

-140-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Deliver Us from Evil: An Interpretation of American Prohibition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • 1 - Indulgences and Disciplines 1
  • 2 - The Cup of Woe 14
  • 3 - Moral Stewardship and Social Disorder 25
  • 4 - Counterculture 45
  • 5 - Protest and Reform 68
  • 6 - A League of Pietists 92
  • 7 - Tables of Law 118
  • 8 - Resistance and Social Change 140
  • 9 - Repeal Politics 181
  • 10 - Legacies of Prohibition 209
  • Acknowledgments and Sources 227
  • Index 237
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.