Deliver Us from Evil: An Interpretation of American Prohibition

By Norman H. Clark | Go to book overview

9
Repeal
Politics

as early as 1922, the Association against the Prohibition Amendment had entered national contests to the extent of endorsing congressional candidates—and thereby handing the vastly more powerful Anti-Saloon League an accurate list of its foes. In 1924, when the AAPA both endorsed and opposed office seekers, it found 262 candidates for the House of Representatives "unsatisfactory." The ASL easily helped 219 of these get elected anyway. After the elections of 1926—the year when, as most historians believe, it was first obvious that a majority of the voters had deep misgivings about the Volstead Act—Congress was drier than at any earlier time. This paradox again underlines the power of the Anti-Saloon League in American political life. It also emphasizes a deeper complexity of American politics: that the wets failed to win in 1928, when the new society of individualism was already well advanced, shows again that Prohibition was seldom an isolated or organic issue and was instead intricately related to the complex nature of politics and social change.

Most participants, and certainly those from the Anti-Saloon League and the Association against the Prohibition Amendment, understood the profound conflict which faced the Democratic Party following the collapse of Woodrow Wilson. It was a conflict symbolized and personified by William Jennings Bryan and Alfred E. Smith—a clash of cultural values, ideals, and lifestyles. The conflict has been variously described as a struggle between the country and the city, the nativist and the immigrant, the liturgical and the pietist, the old America

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Deliver Us from Evil: An Interpretation of American Prohibition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • 1 - Indulgences and Disciplines 1
  • 2 - The Cup of Woe 14
  • 3 - Moral Stewardship and Social Disorder 25
  • 4 - Counterculture 45
  • 5 - Protest and Reform 68
  • 6 - A League of Pietists 92
  • 7 - Tables of Law 118
  • 8 - Resistance and Social Change 140
  • 9 - Repeal Politics 181
  • 10 - Legacies of Prohibition 209
  • Acknowledgments and Sources 227
  • Index 237
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.