An H. P. Lovecraft Encyclopedia

By S. T. Joshi; David E. Schultz | Go to book overview

M

Macauley, George W[illiam] (1885–1969). Amateur journalist and colleague of HPL. Macauley coedited The New Member (a magazine for recent recruits to the UAPA) when HPL first joined amateur journalism and accordingly accepted HPL’s earliest amateur contribution, the essay “A Task for Amateur Journalists” (July 1914). He received his first letter from HPL on October 23, 1914, and continued to correspond regularly until about 1920, after which their correspondence was reduced to Christmas cards; but it revived in 1932. In 1915 HPL wrote to him: “I wish that I could write fiction, but it seems almost an impossibility.” After HPL’s death Macauley published several works by and about HPL in his amateur journal, The O-Wash-Ta-Nong, including “Perverted Poesie or Modern Metre” (December 1937), “Ibid” (January 1938), and “Extracts from H.P.Lovecraft’s Letters to G.W.Macauley” (Spring 1938; rpt LS No. 3 [Fall 1980]: 11–16).

Machen, Arthur [Llewellyn Jones] (1863–1947). Welsh author of horror stories, journalist, autobiographer. Machen gained early notoriety for “The Great God Pan” (1890; collected in The Great God Pan and The Inmost Light [1894]), The Three Impostors (1895), and other works that were accused of being the outpourings of a diseased and licentious imagination. HPL discovered Machen in late spring 1923, evidently at the urging of Frank Belknap Long (see SL 1.250); at that time HPL actually considered Machen “the greatest living author” (SL 1.234). Machen was temperamentally very different from HPL: an Anglo-Catholic and mystic, he bitterly resented the increasing authority of science over human affairs. HPL’s “The Dunwich Horror” seems clearly a borrowing of the central idea of “The Great God Pan” (a god impregnating a human being), while that of “Cool Air” is (by HPL’s own admission) derived in part from “Novel of the White Powder” (a segment in The Three Impostors). “The Call of Cthulhu” and “The Whisperer in Darkness” owe something to “Novel of the Black Seal” in the same volume, which conveys horror by the “documentary approach” of slow and me-

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An H. P. Lovecraft Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • A 1
  • B 14
  • C 27
  • D 57
  • E 83
  • F 89
  • G 97
  • H 103
  • I 122
  • J 129
  • K 136
  • L 141
  • M 161
  • N 181
  • O 192
  • P 200
  • Q 220
  • R 222
  • S 230
  • T 260
  • U 281
  • V 285
  • W 288
  • Z 307
  • General Bibliography 309
  • Index 313
  • About the Authors 340
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