An Ambrose Bierce Companion

By Robert L. Gale | Go to book overview

Chronology

1842

Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce (1842–1914?) born 24 June in Meigs County, Ohio, youngest of ten surviving children of Marcus Aurelius Bierce* and Laura Sherwood Bierce.*

1846

Moves with family to Koskiusco County, Indiana; Bierce attends school, meets Bernice Wright.*

1857

Moves alone to Warsaw, Indiana, and works as a printer’s devil for anti-slavery newspaper.

1859

Moves to Akron, Ohio, lives with uncle, Lucas Verus Bierce; attends Kentucky Military Institute, Franklin Springs.

1860

Leaves Kentucky Military Institute, moves to Elkhart, Indiana, works at various odd jobs.

1861

May, enlists in 9th Indiana Volunteers, Union Army, for three-month hitch; proceeds to western Virginia. June, in Civil War battle of Philippi; July, as sergeant major, in battle of Richmond Mountain and Laurel Hill; mustered out, re-enlists for three years, is promoted to sergeant. October, on reconnaissance at Cheat Mountain. December, in battle of Buffalo Mountain.

1862

April, under Colonel William B. Hazen* in battle of Shiloh. December, as second lieutenant, in battle of Stones River.

1863

April, promoted to first lieutenant. May, becomes topographical engineer under General Hazen. September, in battle of Chickamauga. November, in battle of Missionary Ridge. December, on leave to Warsaw, is engaged to Bernice Wright.

1864

February, returns to active duty. May, proceeds to Georgia, in battle of Resaca. June, at battle of Kennesaw Mountain, is shot in head, is hospitalized in Chattanooga. July–September, on leave in Warsaw. Engage-

-xv-

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An Ambrose Bierce Companion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • A 1
  • B 21
  • C 45
  • D 65
  • E 87
  • F 91
  • G 105
  • H 115
  • I 141
  • J 147
  • K 155
  • L 157
  • M 171
  • N 203
  • O 209
  • P 221
  • Q 239
  • R 241
  • S 251
  • T 279
  • U 291
  • V 293
  • W 295
  • Y-X 309
  • General Bibliography 311
  • Index 315
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