Presidents from Washington through Monroe, 1789-1825: Debating the Issues in Pro and Con Primary Documents

By Amy H. Sturgis | Go to book overview

4

JAMES MADISON

(1809–1817)


INTRODUCTION

When John Adams followed George Washington as president of the United States, he had remarkable shoes to fill; the general’s vision of the office shaped it to such a degree that Adams seemed like a poor fit. The precedent of personality even over policy fueled expectations from the citizens and leaders alike. Adams withdrew rather than reinterpret the position for himself, and this caused many of the problems and frustrations of his term in office. His achievements paled in comparison to his failure to be another Washington.

Thomas Jefferson’s presidency was like another first. He reformed the office in his own image and reaped great disappointments and even greater successes. Paradoxically, Jefferson behaved less as monarch than as everyman, and yet he wielded more power in his administration than Washington even imagined. Jefferson’s successor seemed doomed to the same cycle Adams had faced. James Madison could not be Thomas Jefferson.

The second and fourth presidents did share similarities. Both highly admired the men they replaced as chief executive. Both were smaller men in stature and force of personality than the presidents they followed. Both had perhaps intellectually meatier, though certainly less glamorous, lives in public service than the men who preceded them. Both inherited cabinet members and agendas from their predecessors. Unlike Adams, however, Madison had never been called a fiery orator or a rousing leader. The diminutive, scholarly Madison rose to the foreground when forced, but preferred to contribute from behind the scenes through writ-

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Presidents from Washington through Monroe, 1789-1825: Debating the Issues in Pro and Con Primary Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iv
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Timeline xv
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - George Washington 11
  • 2 - John Adams 49
  • 3 - Thomas Jefferson 81
  • 4 - James Madison 121
  • 5 - James Monroe 155
  • Recommended Readings 188
  • Bibliography 189
  • Index 193
  • About the Author 199
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 199

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.