Theory, Method, and Practice in Computer Content Analysis

By Mark D. West | Go to book overview

Contributors

Gretchen W.Arian is a Senior Consumer Research Analyst at the Walgreen Corporation in Deerfield, Illinois. She focuses on the consumer and uses qualitative and quantitative research to develop marketing strategies to build communication programs. Recent articles are included in the Encyclopedia of Creativity and the Encyclopedia of Psychology.

Rebecca F.Brace is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. Her research in natural language processing has produced numerous technical papers. Her research is currently funded by a grant from the Office of Naval Research.

Donald L.Diefenbach is an Assistant Professor of Mass Communication at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. His research interests include media violence and content analysis methods. Don teaches courses in media effects, communication research methods, and video production.

Linda K.Fuller (Ph.D., University of Massachusetts) is a Professor in the Communications Department of Worcester State College. Responsible for more than 300 professional publications and conference reports, she is the author/(co-)editor of more than 20 books. In 1996, while a Fulbright Senior Fellow at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, she conducted a research course on Content Analysis for which she was highly indebted to George Gerbner.

Roderick P.Hart holds the Shivers Chair in Communication and Government at the University of Texas at Austin and serves as director of the Annette Strauss Institute for Civic Participation. He is the author or editor of ten books including Seducing America: How Television Charms the Modern Voter and Campaign Talk: Why Elections Are Good for Us, recently published by Princeton University Press. Grant support includes the Ford Foundation,

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