The American Peace Crusade, 1815-1860

By Merle Eugene Curti | Go to book overview

II
THE COÖPERATION OF LOCAL SOCIETIES, 1815-1828

From 1815 to 1828 American peace sentiment was marked by its local character, since the peace societies, spontaneously formed in widely separated communities, maintained independent existences. But soon they began to exchange letters with one another, and gradually something like a unified action in the interest of peace developed. Until the formation of the American Peace Society in 1828, however, the story is largely the story of local, independent organizations. Of these the Massachusetts Peace Society was by far the most important.

Although largely religious in origin, the Massachusetts Peace Society included among its members many laymen. President John Thornton Kirkland of Harvard College and some of the professors of that institution were among its early members. Noah Worcester wrote to the editor of the British Herald of Peace in 1819 that the Society included "many justices of the peace and members of the State Legislature, several who have occupied seats in Congress, several respectable judges in our courts, amongst whom is the chief justice of the Supreme Court of this state. We also have two of our former governors. Our president has been lieutenant governor during the whole of his presidency."1 Of the non-clerical members none was destined to play for so long as important a rôle as Joshua P. Blanchard, a Boston merchant, who, because of his "Quaker" principles, refused to serve in the militia and had opposed the War of 1812. From the time he attended his first meeting of the Massachusetts Peace Society on January 11, 1816, until his death in 1868, he was one of the most devoted and loyal workers in the American movement. The contribution to the cause of such a humble layman as Blanchard proved far more important than that of many more distinguished men. Worcester felt, none the less, the

____________________
1
Herald of Peace, vol. i, January, 1819, p. 5.

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Peace Crusade, 1815-1860
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.