The American Peace Crusade, 1815-1860

By Merle Eugene Curti | Go to book overview

III
THE AGITATION FOR PEACE, 1828-1841

As in the period between 1815 and 1828 Noah Worcester was the dominant figure in the American peace movement, so in the succeeding period of national organization William Ladd was the chief source of its vitality until his death in 1841. Apparently father of the idea of a national peace society, without him it could scarcely have been realized. "The objects of such a society," he wrote, "are to give a tone of prominence, unity, and strength to all the exertions of all the friends of peace in the United States, and indeed of all the inhabitants of North America."1 Had this not been done, the development of the American peace movement must inevitably have been greatly retarded.

The odds against Ladd were so great that it seemed as if he might be called on to abandon his cherished Maine farm and devote himself entirely to travel. Great as such a sacrifice would be, he was ready to make it. At his instance the peace societies of Maine, Massachusetts, and Portsmouth, New Hampshire, passed during the winter of 1827 resolutions favoring the formation of a national society and appointed Ladd as their agent to achieve that end. Armed with a proposed constitution drawn up by Noah Worcester, he visited peace meetings and secured its endorsement. He had hoped for support in New York, but the largest of his five audiences there numbered only seven persons. Such indifference made his task seem almost hopeless. "I assure you," he wrote to the Reverend Samuel J. May, "it requires no small degree of perseverance to bear up against all the discouragements which I meet with, but I do not and I never will despair of its final success." Though in Philadelphia no one would serve without pay as corresponding secretary of the proposed national society, he took hope from the fact that one of

____________________
1
William Ladd to the Rev. Samuel J. May, March 1, 1827, in William Ladd Letter Book. For a brief sketch and excellent bibliography of Ladd, see Advocate of Peace, vol. 89, no. 11, November, 1927, pp. 608-611.

-42-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Peace Crusade, 1815-1860
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.