The American Peace Crusade, 1815-1860

By Merle Eugene Curti | Go to book overview

IV
THE LIMITS OF PACIFISM

The peace movement, like the temperance crusade, had its moderates and its extremists. The friends of peace were never unanimous in their attitude towards defensive war, and therefore the American Peace Society only haltingly advanced towards the position of condemning all wars, whether offensive or defensive. The period preceding this nailing of the flag to the topmast was marked by an active conflict of ideas. On the one hand this conflict helped to clarify the pacifist position, but on the other hand it led to a dissipation of energy and finally to a rupture within the peace movement.

As long as the movement was dominated by Noah Worcester and the Massachusetts Peace Society, the moderates, who admitted the Scriptural legality and justifiableness of defensive wars, more than held the field. Indeed, Joshua P. Blanchard later observed that he had the "misfortune to be alone among the respected founders of the cause in Boston" in his thoroughgoing stand of condemning all wars.1 His colleagues, in merely denouncing war in general terms, thus differed both from the London Peace Society and from Dodge, who from the first had taken the ground that all war was contrary to Christianity. Dodge claimed the half-heartedness of the Massachusetts Peace Society as an excuse for not working very vigorously with it. At Philadelphia, as we have seen, the Friend referred to the halfway convictions of many peace societies as a cause of Quaker indifference towards them.

It was perhaps the temperate personality of Worcester which kept him from committing himself squarely on the issue of defensive war. Though the Friend of Peace for the most part kept silent on this question, its editor in 1822 admitted into the pages of his periodical—and perhaps even wrote—a Socratic dia-

____________________
1
Coues, Ms. Peace Album, testimony of J. P. Blanchard.

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Peace Crusade, 1815-1860
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.