The American Peace Crusade, 1815-1860

By Merle Eugene Curti | Go to book overview

VI
THE BEGINNINGS OF INTERNATIONAL
ORGANIZATION

From the beginning of the peace agitation its international character had to some extent been emphasized. Publications had been interchanged and the periodicals of the societies in England, France and the United States had frequently inserted accounts of the activities of their foreign co-workers. Yet in 1842 there was reason to doubt whether sufficient progress had been made in the cause to justify an attempt at a more formal international organization. There was especially little to hope for from the continent of Europe. Although the Society of Christian Morals at Paris appointed in 1841 a special committee on peace, that organization for the most part was attempting little if any practical work for the cause.1

The first move of a definitely international character occurred in 1842, when the London Peace Society sent an agent to work on the Continent and financed a prize essay competition for the Society of Christian Morals. The premium of a thousand francs was divided between M. Bazan and M. Charles Pecqueur. Their essays were published, and medals were awarded three of the twenty-four contestants. Thus the cause of peace was advertised, and both the London Peace Society and the Society of Christian Morals became more widely known on the Continent.2

As the American and British peace movements claimed for their respective countries a peculiar mission to lead the world in peace, so French pacifists claimed a similar mission for France. Yet organized French pacifism was far behind that of America

____________________
1
Herald of Peace, January, February, March, 1835, p. 57; Advocate of Peace, vol. iv, October, 1841, p. 71.
2
Advocate of Peace, vol. iv, October, 1841, p. 71; Villenave, Mathieu G. T. de Société de la Morale Chrétienne, Rapport sur le concours ouvert . . . a l'assemblé . . . le 18 avril 1842, Paris, 1842; M. Bazan, Discours couronné par la Société de la Morale Chrétienne, Paris, 1842; C. Pecqueur, De la Paix, de son principe et de sa réalisation, Paris, 1842; P. R. Marchand, Nouveau Projet de Traité de Paix Perpétuelle, Paris, 1852.

-132-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Peace Crusade, 1815-1860
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.