The American Peace Crusade, 1815-1860

By Merle Eugene Curti | Go to book overview

INDEX
Aberdeen, Lord, 205.
Adams, John Quincy, Congress of Nations, 57, 58, 59; Fourth of July Address, 64; Mexican claims controversy, 63, privateering, 29.
Advocate of Peace, 45, 47, 49, 62, 91, 95, 124, 136, 143, 221, 223.
Afghan War, 111-112.
Africa Peace Society, 33.
Alexander, Emperor of Russia, 27, 28.
Alger, W. R., An American Voice on the Lessons of the War, 211.
Allen, Dr. William, President of Bowdoin College, 71, 77.
Allen, William, formation of London Peace Society, 5, 16.
American mission and world peace, 53-54.
American Peace Society, organization, 42-43; constitution, 43, 72, 76, 78- 80, 93, 94; growth, 44, 201-202; finances, 43-44, 201; attitude on defensive war, 67, 70, 72 ff.; on New England Non-Resistance Society, 85, 87; northeastern boundary dispute, 103; Canadian Rebellion, 108; Garrison, indictment of, 80; activities during Mexican War, 123- 125; Crimean War, 210-211; Declaration of Paris, 213-215; campaign for stipulated arbitration, 194 ff.; international peace congresses, 171, 172, 179, 186; dodges slavery issue, 220 ff.; decline of, 202-203. see Beckwith, Burritt, Defensive war, Ladd.
American Revolution, peace sentiment, 32, 52-53, 70. seeWorcester, Noah.
Anglo-American rivalry in Central America, 216.
Anglo-Chinese War, 215-216.
Antislavery agitation, relation to peace crusade, 29, 57, 64, 81, 82, 136, 137, 150, 176, 194, 197, 218, 220- 223. seeReforms.
Arbitration, American interest in, 126; Mexican claims, 46; Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, 127; northeastern boundary, 109-110; championed by Pecqueur, 133; Burritt, 130, 191- 192; Cobden, 172, 190-191, 192- 193; Joseph Sturge, 190; William Jay, 189; Henry Richard, 189; Free Soil Party, 197; London Peace Convention, 139; Brussels Peace Convention, 169; Cobden's Parliamentary resolution in favor of, 191; debate on, 192-193; press, 193; campaign for in Congress, 194 ff.; efforts of peace crusaders to effect arbitration in Schleswig-Holstein controversy, 183-186; Claims and Fisheries Treaties, 198-199; Congress of Paris, 212 ff.; difference in American and British attitude towards, 176.
Aroostook War, 107.
Ashburton, Lord, 111.
Bacheler, Origen, Mexican claims, 46; praises President Van Buren's pacific sentiments, 107; criticizes League of Universal Brotherhood, 155.
Bagot-Rush Convention, 28.
Balance of Power, American Condemnation of, 211.
Ballou, Adin, Non-Resistant, 80-81; editor, The Non-Resistant, 86; writings and labors in behalf of non- resistance, 86-87.
Bancroft, George, 173, note.
Barnard, Henry, 66, 135.
Beckwith, George C., successor to Ladd, 60, 78; delegate to London Peace Convention, 137; to London Peace Congress, 187; favors catholic platform for American Peace Society, 78, 80, 87-88, 90-93, 95-96; attitude towards Non-Resistance, 82, 85, 86; opposed by "reform group," 91- 92, 93-94, 97-99, 100; financial policy criticized, 97-98, 100; exoneration of, 101; regrets controversies in American Peace Society, 102; outlines causes of apathy towards peace cause, 103-104; opposes association

-243-

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