Educating Children with AD/HD: A Teacher's Manual

By Paul Cooper; Fintan J. O'Regan | Go to book overview

11

AD/HD with Impulsivity

AD/HD is sometimes very deceptive in the ways it manifests itself. One such case was that of Lucy. She was 5 feet 10 inches tall, 16 years old, with blonde hair, and always dressed fashionably. Many people remarked on her ‘stunning’ good looks. But Lucy was very unpopular with her peers. One of her teachers recalled one very sad memory of her going to him at the end of the Easter term and asking to borrow a basketball for the holidays. This was really a strange request, as Lucy was not known to have any particular enthusiasm for basketball when she was required to play the game at school. When pressed on the matter she admitted that it was to give her something to do during the break, as nobody wanted to spend time with her during the next two weeks. They all think I’m silly,’ she explained, still maintaining that degree of optimism only she could offer in such circumstances. The thing was that although he felt sorry for her, her teacher understood exactly what the girl was talking about.


Hyperactivity/Impulsiveness, Clumsiness and Over-talkativeness

Lucy had the unique ability of leaving unintended mayhem in her wake. An example of this would be at the end of the lesson; she would pack up her overflowing book bag, toss her hair backwards and swing the bag over her shoulder in one movement. At this point utter chaos could occur as all personnel and objects within a radius of 6 feet were in serious danger of being struck by both bag and flying books. The more other people (including the teacher) called to her to take care, the more she spun around and more havoc she created. This may sound humorous, and maybe it was at first. But the joke soon wore thin (like most jokes do) when it went on for too long. People began to think: This happens too often to be funny.’

Lucy’s hyperactivity and impulsivity not only involved this form of motor clumsiness, but it had a verbal aspect too. Lucy seemed to have enormous difficulty in stopping herself from saying whatever happened to be in her mind at the time. Again, what seemed at first like charming, youthful exuberance soon became tiresome and

-72-

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Educating Children with AD/HD: A Teacher's Manual
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Part 1 - Understanding Ad/Hd 1
  • 1 - Ad/Hd 3
  • 2 - Ad/Hd in the Classroom: Teacher and Student Perspectives 8
  • 3 - Ad/Hd and Other Problems 18
  • 4 - Biology, Brains and Ad/Hd 21
  • 5 - Ad/Hd and Destiny 25
  • Part 2 - Principles and Practices for Intervention with Ad/Hd 31
  • 6 - The Multi-Modal Approach to Intervention 33
  • 7 - Ad/Hd in the Classroom: Basic Principles and Practices 45
  • Part 3 - Ad/Hd in Action: Case Studies 57
  • 8 - The Different Faces of Ad/Hd 59
  • 9 - Ad/Hd with Oppositional Defiance 63
  • 10 - Ad/Hd with Detachment 68
  • 11 - Ad/Hd with Impulsivity 72
  • 12 - Ad/Hd with Obsessions 76
  • 13 - Ad/Hd with Learning Difficulties 81
  • 14 - Ad/Hd with High Ability 85
  • 15 - Ad/Hd with Conduct Disorder 89
  • 16 - Ad/Hd: Combined Type 94
  • 17 - And in the End: Caring for the Carers 98
  • Appendix 1 104
  • Appendix 2 106
  • References 109
  • Index 113
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