Educating Children with AD/HD: A Teacher's Manual

By Paul Cooper; Fintan J. O'Regan | Go to book overview

17

And in the End: Caring for the Carers

As we have noted many times throughout this book students with AD/HD never exist in a vacuum. The school exists as a complex organisation with its own specific ethos and characteristics which may help or hinder the progress of children with AD/HD. Furthermore, the school exists beneath the weight of a wide range of public expectations, government regulations and sometimes conflicting demands for accountability. In turn the students concerned often come from family settings which are experiencing severe stress. Sometimes this is because of the effect of the child’s AD/HD and associated difficulties on the family, and sometimes the child’s difficulties are exacerbated by family problems, which might include AD/HD. In this final chapter we reflect briefly on some of the human factors in the school and in family situations and consider some of the practical ways in which these might be addressed.


The Teacher’s Dilemma

It is appropriate for teachers and other educational workers to see AD/HD very much from an educational perspective, and to be preoccupied with balancing the needs of the child with AD/HD against those of the rest of the school population. This is by no means an easy task. Teachers often feel unfairly torn between competing demands to achieve high academic results for all students, whilst simultaneously being expected to meet a wide range of complex needs, some of which challenge their ability to provide the best educational opportunities to other students.

Teachers who work with students who exhibit social, emotional and behavioural difficulties, such as those associated with AD/HD, are particularly vulnerable in this respect. This is because they are dealing with a group of students who are viewed, at best, ambiguously by the world at large. These are the students that most teachers do not want to teach, whose particular special educational need uniquely places them at permanent risk of being deprived of educational services through exclusion. And yet, against this background of rejection and insecurity, these same teachers are constantly being exhorted to provide these students with experiences of acceptance and security - the very foundations of personal and educational development.

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Educating Children with AD/HD: A Teacher's Manual
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Part 1 - Understanding Ad/Hd 1
  • 1 - Ad/Hd 3
  • 2 - Ad/Hd in the Classroom: Teacher and Student Perspectives 8
  • 3 - Ad/Hd and Other Problems 18
  • 4 - Biology, Brains and Ad/Hd 21
  • 5 - Ad/Hd and Destiny 25
  • Part 2 - Principles and Practices for Intervention with Ad/Hd 31
  • 6 - The Multi-Modal Approach to Intervention 33
  • 7 - Ad/Hd in the Classroom: Basic Principles and Practices 45
  • Part 3 - Ad/Hd in Action: Case Studies 57
  • 8 - The Different Faces of Ad/Hd 59
  • 9 - Ad/Hd with Oppositional Defiance 63
  • 10 - Ad/Hd with Detachment 68
  • 11 - Ad/Hd with Impulsivity 72
  • 12 - Ad/Hd with Obsessions 76
  • 13 - Ad/Hd with Learning Difficulties 81
  • 14 - Ad/Hd with High Ability 85
  • 15 - Ad/Hd with Conduct Disorder 89
  • 16 - Ad/Hd: Combined Type 94
  • 17 - And in the End: Caring for the Carers 98
  • Appendix 1 104
  • Appendix 2 106
  • References 109
  • Index 113
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