Strategies for Showing: Women, Possession, and Representation in English Visual Culture, 1665-1800

By Marcia Pointon | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I HAVE benefited in inestimable ways in researching and writing this book from the advice, help and constructive criticism of many friends and colleagues. Several chapters originated in invitations to give papers at particular events like the 'Allegory and Gender' symposium in Essen in 1992 (Ch. 2), the Angelica Kauffman conference in Brighton in 1992 (Ch. 4), the Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies annual conference 1993 (Ch. 5). All chapters have been delivered as research presentations on at least one occasion, and some have had a number of airings. The opportunity to receive the kinds of critique that such events offer is of unequalled value and I would like to thank not only those who invited me but also those who attended and those who questioned, challenged, and commented. The staff of the many libraries and archives in which I have worked as this book slowly came to completion are owed a great debt of thanks. In particular -- as I have taxed their patience on so many occasions -- I would like to thank the staff of the John Rylands Library of the University of Manchester (Deansgate), the Heinz Archive at the National Portrait Gallery, the Witt Library, the Print Rooms at the Victoria and Albert Museum and the British Museum, and the British Library. I would also like in particular to thank Peter Burton and Michael Pollard not only for their own photographic work, but for encouraging me to believe that I too could do it, and Andy Fairhurst for cheerfully rescuing me from many a computer crisis. The University of Manchester generously provided me with a grant for a research assistant; not only did Emma Chambers and Lucy Peltz give me invaluable research assistance, they were also amusing company and provided much-needed distraction to a harassed Head of Department.

I would like to thank the following individuals who generously took time to respond to my questions: David Alexander, Malcolm Baker, Tim Barringer, Maxine Berg, Paul Binski, Chloe Chard, Deborah Cherry, Helen Clifford, John Coleman, Fintan Cullen, Gisela Ecker, Richard Edgcumb, Elizabeth Einberg, William Griswold, Robin Hamlyn, Gerald Hammond, Revd Peter Hammond, Mr and Mrs Christopher Harley, Eileen Harris, John Hayes, Konrad Hoffman, Tim Ingold, Bill Jackson, Anna Kerr, Charlotte Klonk, Robert Lacey, Christopher Lloyd, Stephen Lloyd, Jennifer Montagu, Kate Nicholson, Frank O'Gorman, Gill Perry, David Peters Corbett, John Pickstone, Ann Pullan, Aileen Ribeiro, Margaret Richardson, Hugh Roberts, Michael Rosenthal, Susanne Rosing, R. C. Roundell, Gill Saunders, Sigrid Schade, Simon ShawMiller, Susan Siegfried, Jacob Simon, Mrs D. A. Staveley, Roey Sweet, Dorcas Taylor, the Hon. R. Turton and Mrs R. Turton, Silke Wenk.

-vii-

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