Collingwood and the Metaphysics of Experience

By Giuseppina D’oro | Go to book overview

2

The Kantian heritage of Collingwood’s descriptive metaphysics

Collingwood’s name is usually associated with his work in the philosophy of history: most professional philosophers are likely to be acquainted with Collingwood’s defence of history as an autonomous discipline with a distinct method and subject matter, either through first-hand acquaintance with The Idea of History (IH), or via Collingwood-inspired clarifications of the distinction between ‘understanding’ and ‘explanation’. However, in spite of the fact that a great part of Collingwood’s work was intended as a reflection on the method and task of philosophy and explicitly presented as an attempt to re-think what metaphysics is, Collingwood’s name rarely features in discussions of the fate of metaphysics in twentieth-century thought and, in particular, in European philosophy after Kant. When Collingwood’s name appears in histories of philosophy it is usually under the heading of ‘The British Idealists’, a heading which, although not inappropriate, tends to suggest that he is a relatively minor figure, a member of a school, which is itself more worthy of attention than his own contribution to it. There has, in other words, been relatively little interest in Collingwood’s work as a valuable addition to that ongoing dialogue that is the history of philosophy. It is not easy to identify the reasons for this neglect. It could be because Collingwood was writing at the tail end of an idealist tradition which was increasingly regarded as largely anachronistic. Or it could be because Collingwood chose to describe his project as an attempt to reform metaphysics, rather than criticise it, at a time when both the emerging traditions of the philosophy of language in the Anglo-American world and that of phenomenology in continental Europe preferred to describe themselves in opposition to, rather than as an extension of, the metaphysics of the past. In this chapter I attempt to do two things. My immediate goal is to explore the reform of metaphysics in Collingwood’s work with an eye to highlighting its Kantian heritage. My ultimate, but more crucial goal, is to emphasise how central some of Collingwood’s concerns are to that very history of philosophy which has often neglected him. I am aware that comparative analyses are often treacherous 1 and always at risk of being shallow; yet it is only in relation to the ongoing dialogue in the history of philosophy that a thinker’s achievements can be

-24-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Collingwood and the Metaphysics of Experience
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 180

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.