Politics in an Era of Divided Government: Elections and Goverance in the Second Clinton Administration

By Harvey L. Schantz | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1

Some Things Are Predictable

Nominating Dole, Clinton, and Perot

EMMETT H. BUELL JR.

This is an account of how the Republican, Democratic, and Reform parties chose their respective presidential nominees in 1996. As memories of the last nominating cycle fade, we tend to forget how slim the odds of a second Clinton term once seemed or how much H. Ross Perot frightened both major parties. Ever adaptable, President Clinton reinvented himself after disaster struck his party in the 1994 midterm elections and he eventually swept to renomination unopposed. No event astonished election analysts less than Perot claiming the nomination of a party of his own making.

Most of what follows is about the Republicans who experienced the only seriously contested nomination of the three. I argue that the Republican choice was highly likely if not wholly predictable owing to what the nominating process has become. Presumably a front-runner can still selfdestruct in such a system, but, if 1996 is any guide, process-related advantages will cancel out short-term factors like candidate style or weak message. Much depends on who else is running, of course, but that, too, is increasingly determined by the process. In 1996, unprecedented “frontloading” of the primary calendar, combined with the associated lack of viable rivals, extraordinary media exposure, and related leads in the polls and fund-raising set Dole up as the inevitable nominee.


NOMINATING STAGES AND FRONT-LOADING

Put simply, the increased resort of state parties to front-loading has changed the dynamics of presidential nominating politics in both of the major parties. The proliferation of February and March primaries now impels aspirants to start campaigning years in advance of the first votes to select convention delegates. Long familiar to pundits as the “invisible primary,” this lengthy run-up to the first caucuses and primaries truly has become the most critical phase of the whole process. 1 This is the time when presidential hopefuls must raise huge sums, recruit activist supporters,

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Politics in an Era of Divided Government: Elections and Goverance in the Second Clinton Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Series Editor Foreword xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Chapter 1 - Some Things Are Predictable 1
  • Chapter 2 - Congressional Nominations in 1996 41
  • Chapter 3 - The Presidential Campaign and Vote in 1996 63
  • Notes 83
  • Chapter 4 - Strategic Partisan Decisions and Blunted National Outcomes 85
  • Chapter 5 - Sideshows and Strategic Separations 105
  • Notes 124
  • Chapter 6 - Clinton’s Second Transition 129
  • Notes 150
  • Chapter 7 - The Irony of the 105th Congress and Its Legacy 155
  • Notes 177
  • Epilogue 181
  • List of Contributors 183
  • Index 185
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 192

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.