The Foreign Investment Debate: Opening Markets Abroad or Closing Markets at Home?

By Cynthia A. Beltz | Go to book overview

Contributors

Cynthia A. Beltz is a research fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. She is the author of High-Tech Maneuvers:Industrial Policy Lessons of HDTV and the editor of Financing Entrepreneurs. Ms. Beltz's articles on technology and trade policy have appeared in the. New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Times, the Journal of Commerce, Reason Magazine, Regulation, and The American Enterprise. She is a columnist for Upside, a magazine for high-technology business executives, and is currently writing Technology and Jobs, a study of the ways in which technological progress affects labor markets. Ms. Beltz has testified before the House Budget and Science committees on American living standards and the problems of high-tech targeting.

Richard Florida is director of the Center for Economic Development and professor of management and public policy at Carnegie Mellon University's H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management. He also serves as consultant to multinational corporations and federal and state government agencies. Mr. Florida is currently working with the Council on Competitiveness on the development of more effective policies for university-industry-government relationships, and with the American Enterprise Institute on the role of international investment in the transformation of the American economy. He is the author of several books, including Beyond Mass Production:The Japanese System and Its Transfer to the United States, cowritten with Martin Kenney, and The Breakthrough Illusion:Corporate America's Failure to Move from Innovation to Mass Production.

Ellen L. Frost was appointed to the new position of counselor to the U.S. Trade Representative in February 1993, reporting directly to Ambassador Mickey Kantor. Before her arrival at USTR, Ms. Frost was

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