Iraq under Siege: The Deadly Impact of Sanctions and War

By Anthony Arnove | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

South End and Pluto Press books are always intensely collaborative projects. Iraq Under Siege is perhaps even more so than usual. Sonia Shah deserves special thanks for encouraging me to edit this book; Loie Hayes and Sonia Shah provided valuable editorial advice; and Lynn Lu, Anne Beech, and Kathleen May also gave much-needed support for this project.

Every one of the contributors to Iraq Under Siege deserves special thanks for their labors not only on this book, but to build the movement to end the war against Iraq.

Robert Jensen, Rahul Mahajan, Romi Mahajan, Stacey Gottlieb, Nagesh Rao, Erica Rubin, Sandy Adler, Joe Richey, Nick Arons, and Chuck Quilty helped crucially with the preparation of several chapters.

Matthew Rothschild at The Progressive, Robert Fisk, The Independent, Boston Mobilization for Survival, David Barsamian, and The Link generously allowed us to use or reprint material for this anthology.

Philippe Rekacewicz and Le Monde diplomatique went to great lengths to provide the map that opens this book. Nikki van der Gaag, the staff at New Internationalist, Alison Reed at Format, Karen Robinson, and Alan Pogue made available the powerful photographs in the book and on the cover, which was designed by Ellen P. Shapiro. Shea Dean copyedited the first draft of Iraq Under Siege, providing many useful editorial suggestions. Rania Masri, Ali Abunimah, Sami Deeb, Nick Arons, Glenn Camp, Richard Pond, Kathy Kelly, Bilal El-Amine, George Capaccio, Afruz Amighi, Drew Hamre, Ellen Repalda, Gillian Russom, and Stacey Gottlieb provided important endnote references, as did the many people who regularly disseminate information useful to the anti-sanctions movement.

My understanding of depleted uranium was aided critically by the generous assistance of Rosalie Bertell, Beatrice Boctor, and Dan Fahey.

I have had the privilege of having a family, friends, and allies who have taught me the meaning of Frederick Douglass' slogan "without struggle, there is no progress." There are too many to mention, but I would especially like to thank Nita Levison, Robert Arnove, Howard Zinn, Noam Chomsky, Edward W. Said, Jason Yanowitz, Annie Zirin, Sharon Smith, Gillian Russom, Elizabeth Terzakis, Bilal El-Amine, Bo Ekelund, and my many comrades in the International Socialist Organization, the Rhode Island Emergency Response Network, and the anti-sanctions movement.

-vii-

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Iraq under Siege: The Deadly Impact of Sanctions and War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Praise for Irag under Siege i
  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 9
  • Notes 17
  • Part 1 - The Roots of Us/Uk Policy 21
  • Chapter 1 - America's War against Iraq: 1990-1999 23
  • Notes 32
  • Chapter 2 - Iraq: the Impact of Sanctions and Us Policy 35
  • Notes 46
  • Chapter 3 - Us Iraq Policy 47
  • Notes 55
  • Part 2 - Myths and Realities 57
  • Chapter 4 - Collateral Damage 59
  • Notes 64
  • Chapter 5 - Myths and Realities regarding Iraq and Sanctions 67
  • Notes 73
  • Chapter 6 - The Media's Deadly Spin on Iraq 77
  • Notes 89
  • Chapter 7 - The Hidden War 93
  • Notes 103
  • Chapter 8 - One Iraqi's Story 105
  • Notes 107
  • Part 3 - Life under Sanctions 109
  • Chapter 9 - Raising Voices 111
  • Notes 124
  • Chapter 10 - Targets—not Victims 127
  • Notes 136
  • Chapter 11 - Sanctions: Killing a Country and a People 137
  • Notes 147
  • Part 4 - Documenting the Impact of Sanctions 149
  • Chapter 12 - Sanctions, Food, Nutrition, and Health in Iraq 151
  • Notes 165
  • Chapter 13 - Toxic Pollution, the Gulf War, and Sanctions 169
  • Notes 175
  • Part 5 - Activist Responses 179
  • Chapter 14 - Sanctions Are Weapons of Mass Destruction 181
  • Notes 183
  • Chapter 15 - Building the Movement to End Sanctions 185
  • Notes 196
  • Chapter 16 - Resources Organizations Working to End Sanctions on Iraq 199
  • About the Authors 201
  • Index 205
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