Iraq under Siege: The Deadly Impact of Sanctions and War

By Anthony Arnove | Go to book overview

December 1998 bombing was selected to make this very plain. The press reported that the bombing began while the Security Council was in a special session to deal with the issue of Iraq. The members of the Security Council weren't notified prior to the US/ UK decision to launch an attack. 20 That's a message of contempt for the UN.

It's quite important for us to decide whether that's the "national persona that we [want to] project," as internal documents put it. 21 Of course, for a rogue state, international law and the UN Charter don't mean any- thing—especially for a rogue state that's violent and lawless and that's projecting that as its "national persona." That gains particular significance when that rogue state happens to be the most powerful state in the world.

Unless that's reversed, I think you can be pretty confident that there are ugly times ahead, particularly if the anticipated oil crisis in the Middle East becomes reality. The answer to how seriously we take that depends not on what happens in this room, but what happens afterward. That's where the important things will happen. I really urge you to participate.

Based on a talk given January 30, 1999, Cambridge, Massachusetts


Notes
1.
Editorial, "A Just Attack", Boston Globe, December 17, 1998, p. A30.
2.
See Noam Chomsky, Deterring Democracy, updated ed. ( New York: Hill and Wang, 1992), p. 152, and "'What We Say Goes':"The Middle Eastin the New World Order, in Collateral Damage:The 'New World Order' at Home and Abroad, ed. Cynthia Peters ( Boston: South End Press, 1992), pp. 61-64 and references; Andrew Cockburn and Patrick Cockburn, Out of the Ashes:The Resurrection of Saddam Hussein ( New York: HarperCollins, 1999); and Mark Phythian, Arming Iraq:How the U.S. and Britain Secretly Built Saddam's War Machine ( Boston: Northeastern UP, 1996).
3.
Leslie Stahl, "Punishing Saddam", produced by Catherine Olian, CBS, 60 Minutes, May 12, 1996.
4.
Charles Glass, "The Emperors of Enforcement", New Statesman 127/4373 ( February 20, 1998): 14-15.
5.
Peter Pringle, "Bush Plays a Delicate Game with Baghdad", The Independent, April 24, 1990, p. 16; Jackson Diehl, "US Maligns Him, Iraqi Tells Senators", Washington Post, April 12, 1990, p. A26; Dilip Hiro, The Longest War:The Iran-Iraq Military Conflict ( New York: Routledge, 1991), pp. 237-240; Miron Rezun, Saddam Hussein's Gulf War ( Westport, Connecticut: Praeger, 1992), pp. 58f.; and Cockburn and Cockburn, Out of the Ashes, p. 245.
6.
See Chomsky, "What We Say Goes," in Collateral Damage, p. 58.
7.
See Saul Bloom, John M. Miller, James Warner, and Philipa Winkler, eds., Hidden Casualties: Environmental, Health, and Political Consequences of thePersian Gulf War

-55-

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Iraq under Siege: The Deadly Impact of Sanctions and War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Praise for Irag under Siege i
  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 9
  • Notes 17
  • Part 1 - The Roots of Us/Uk Policy 21
  • Chapter 1 - America's War against Iraq: 1990-1999 23
  • Notes 32
  • Chapter 2 - Iraq: the Impact of Sanctions and Us Policy 35
  • Notes 46
  • Chapter 3 - Us Iraq Policy 47
  • Notes 55
  • Part 2 - Myths and Realities 57
  • Chapter 4 - Collateral Damage 59
  • Notes 64
  • Chapter 5 - Myths and Realities regarding Iraq and Sanctions 67
  • Notes 73
  • Chapter 6 - The Media's Deadly Spin on Iraq 77
  • Notes 89
  • Chapter 7 - The Hidden War 93
  • Notes 103
  • Chapter 8 - One Iraqi's Story 105
  • Notes 107
  • Part 3 - Life under Sanctions 109
  • Chapter 9 - Raising Voices 111
  • Notes 124
  • Chapter 10 - Targets—not Victims 127
  • Notes 136
  • Chapter 11 - Sanctions: Killing a Country and a People 137
  • Notes 147
  • Part 4 - Documenting the Impact of Sanctions 149
  • Chapter 12 - Sanctions, Food, Nutrition, and Health in Iraq 151
  • Notes 165
  • Chapter 13 - Toxic Pollution, the Gulf War, and Sanctions 169
  • Notes 175
  • Part 5 - Activist Responses 179
  • Chapter 14 - Sanctions Are Weapons of Mass Destruction 181
  • Notes 183
  • Chapter 15 - Building the Movement to End Sanctions 185
  • Notes 196
  • Chapter 16 - Resources Organizations Working to End Sanctions on Iraq 199
  • About the Authors 201
  • Index 205
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