Iraq under Siege: The Deadly Impact of Sanctions and War

By Anthony Arnove | Go to book overview

Step 5: Become a source

In our experience, the vast majority of journalists are decent people. They may not be experts on the issue you are interested in, and they rely on the information their sources give them, so it pays to become a source of timely and reliable information and analysis. Provide information in moderate doses. If you bombard a journalist with lengthy e-mails of articles you find fascinating, he or she is unlikely to read them. Always inform reporters of local events that could educate them about Iraq.

Once you establish a record and some credibility, journalists will begin to turn to you to discuss ideas, or even ask for quotes and interviews. Now, you have become a source.


Step 6: Develop networks

Share your letters with interested friends and fellow activists. This will encourage others to follow your example, and will help others to become more critical and astute consumers of news.


Step 7: Be persistent

Media advocacy can be frustrating and hard, but it works and it gets easier. The more expertise you develop and information you gather, the easier it is to respond and to help shape debate constructively.


Notes
1
See Los Angeles Times Wire Services, "US Congressional Staffers Pay Visit to Iraqi Hospital", Los Angeles Times, August 31, 1999, p. A9; and Unicef, Child and Maternal Mortaliy Survey 1999:Preliminary Report ( Iraq: Unicef, 1999). Hereafter Unicef 1999. Available at http://www.unicef.org.
2
John MacArthur, Second Front:Censorship and Propaganda in the Gulf War ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992); Douglas Kellner, The Persian Gulf TV War ( Boulder: Westview Press, 1992); and Hamid Mowlana , George Gerbner, and Herbert 1. Schiller, eds., Triumph of the Image:The Media's War in the Persian Gulf—A Global Perspective ( Boulder: Westview Press, 1992).
3
Recent examples include the 1998 Hollywood film The Siege, which contained negative portrayals of Arab Americans as terrorists or suspected terrorists; a magazine advertising campaign for a video game called "Gulf War"; and a fall 1999 episode of the NBC drama "West Wing." The video game advertisement features a picture of a bathroom. On the toilet paper holder is the American flag. On the floor is an Arabic-language newspaper. The caption reads: "Hasn't Iraq made a mockery of us long enough?" The NBC program featured a story line in which Syria shoots down a US Air

-89-

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Iraq under Siege: The Deadly Impact of Sanctions and War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Praise for Irag under Siege i
  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 9
  • Notes 17
  • Part 1 - The Roots of Us/Uk Policy 21
  • Chapter 1 - America's War against Iraq: 1990-1999 23
  • Notes 32
  • Chapter 2 - Iraq: the Impact of Sanctions and Us Policy 35
  • Notes 46
  • Chapter 3 - Us Iraq Policy 47
  • Notes 55
  • Part 2 - Myths and Realities 57
  • Chapter 4 - Collateral Damage 59
  • Notes 64
  • Chapter 5 - Myths and Realities regarding Iraq and Sanctions 67
  • Notes 73
  • Chapter 6 - The Media's Deadly Spin on Iraq 77
  • Notes 89
  • Chapter 7 - The Hidden War 93
  • Notes 103
  • Chapter 8 - One Iraqi's Story 105
  • Notes 107
  • Part 3 - Life under Sanctions 109
  • Chapter 9 - Raising Voices 111
  • Notes 124
  • Chapter 10 - Targets—not Victims 127
  • Notes 136
  • Chapter 11 - Sanctions: Killing a Country and a People 137
  • Notes 147
  • Part 4 - Documenting the Impact of Sanctions 149
  • Chapter 12 - Sanctions, Food, Nutrition, and Health in Iraq 151
  • Notes 165
  • Chapter 13 - Toxic Pollution, the Gulf War, and Sanctions 169
  • Notes 175
  • Part 5 - Activist Responses 179
  • Chapter 14 - Sanctions Are Weapons of Mass Destruction 181
  • Notes 183
  • Chapter 15 - Building the Movement to End Sanctions 185
  • Notes 196
  • Chapter 16 - Resources Organizations Working to End Sanctions on Iraq 199
  • About the Authors 201
  • Index 205
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