Iraq under Siege: The Deadly Impact of Sanctions and War

By Anthony Arnove | Go to book overview

resented an indigenous nationalist potential, and Washington decided it had to be neutralized militarily, technologically, and economically. Thus Iraqis with education, will, skills, and dreams became the targets. Institutions that taught, nourished, and supported them—such as museums, schools, medical colleges, fish hatcheries, the solar energy research center, clubs and seminars, and professional journals—had to be decimated, too.

In 1990, a high-ranking US military officer asked his planners and experts on Iraq "what is unique about Iraqi culture that they put very high value on [that our military could target]?" 8 The embargo is phase two of that bombing strategy. With it, Washington is telling men like Mustafa that his library will be sold and may disappear from the country, that his car will become useless, his phone will not work, and his life span will be halved. His educated children will not find work; or, with other hungry young men and women, they will go to the farms to dig potatoes; and the mosque will replace their electronics seminar.

The UN has instituted a relief program (paid for by Iraq) that ensures most of Iraq's population will not die of starvation. Yet Iraqis have become so weak that few can think beyond how to find enough food for their family. The oil-for-food scheme that the US government allowed the UN to put in place merely keeps famine at bay so Washington and its friends cannot be accused of genocide.

Was Mustafa just a victim? Or were he and the millions who have died or fled—infant or adult, woman or man, Kurd or Christian, teacher or student—targets?


Notes
1
Noam Chomsky, Fateful Triangle:Israel, the United States, and the Palestinians, updated ed. ( Cambridge: South End Press Classics, 1999), p. x.
2
Chomsky, Fateful Triangle, p. xii.
3
Noam Chomsky, Year 501:The Conquest Continues ( Boston: South End Press, 1993).
4
Based on author interviews with doctors at Kerbala General Hospital, Iraq, in 1995 and 1998.
5
Ferdous Al-Mukhtar and Naziha Adib, Arabian Cuisine (Surrey, UK: Surbiton/Laam Publishers, 1993).
6
See Amartya Sen, Development as Freedom ( New York: Knopf, 1999).
7
Kathy Kelly, "Statement from Baghdad", February 23, 1998.
8
Rick Atkinson, "U.S. to Rely on Air Strikes if War Erupts", Washington Post, September 16, 1990, p A1.

-136-

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Iraq under Siege: The Deadly Impact of Sanctions and War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Praise for Irag under Siege i
  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 9
  • Notes 17
  • Part 1 - The Roots of Us/Uk Policy 21
  • Chapter 1 - America's War against Iraq: 1990-1999 23
  • Notes 32
  • Chapter 2 - Iraq: the Impact of Sanctions and Us Policy 35
  • Notes 46
  • Chapter 3 - Us Iraq Policy 47
  • Notes 55
  • Part 2 - Myths and Realities 57
  • Chapter 4 - Collateral Damage 59
  • Notes 64
  • Chapter 5 - Myths and Realities regarding Iraq and Sanctions 67
  • Notes 73
  • Chapter 6 - The Media's Deadly Spin on Iraq 77
  • Notes 89
  • Chapter 7 - The Hidden War 93
  • Notes 103
  • Chapter 8 - One Iraqi's Story 105
  • Notes 107
  • Part 3 - Life under Sanctions 109
  • Chapter 9 - Raising Voices 111
  • Notes 124
  • Chapter 10 - Targets—not Victims 127
  • Notes 136
  • Chapter 11 - Sanctions: Killing a Country and a People 137
  • Notes 147
  • Part 4 - Documenting the Impact of Sanctions 149
  • Chapter 12 - Sanctions, Food, Nutrition, and Health in Iraq 151
  • Notes 165
  • Chapter 13 - Toxic Pollution, the Gulf War, and Sanctions 169
  • Notes 175
  • Part 5 - Activist Responses 179
  • Chapter 14 - Sanctions Are Weapons of Mass Destruction 181
  • Notes 183
  • Chapter 15 - Building the Movement to End Sanctions 185
  • Notes 196
  • Chapter 16 - Resources Organizations Working to End Sanctions on Iraq 199
  • About the Authors 201
  • Index 205
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