Shock Waves: Eastern Europe after the Revolutions

By John Feffer | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This book has been a collaborative effort. I relied on the help and wisdom of hundreds of men and women in the countries through which I traveled. I have cited many of these people in this book, but in comparison to their guidance, citation seems a pale recompense. I only hope that when they visit the United States I can repay their kindness. For their personal help, I would particularly like to thank Elzbieta Bohomolec, Bogdan Lapinski, Abel Soriano and Bogusia Pienkowska, Ryszard and Maria Holzer, Michaela Sikorova, and Vasek Novotny, Jaime Walker and David Crawford, Fred Abrahams, Mara and Nicolae Savitiu, Florentina and Valentina Hristea, Zoja Skusek and family, and Olga Melnikova. The names and contacts provided by Joanne Landy and the Campaign for Peace and Democracy, Jenny Yancey and Dan Siegal of New Visions, Victoria Brown, Tom Conrad, Virden Seybold, Bogdan Denitch, and Peter Jarman were greatly appreciated.

I am also deeply grateful for the assistance I received stateside from the American Friends Service Committee. Special thanks to Michael Simmons and the East-West Program for entrusting me with the task of traveling in the region; Michael's faith in me and this enterprise sustained me through many a trying time. Thanks also to Corinne Johnson for supporting this project with patience and care, and for reading over an early draft of this book with a keen editor's eye. Hazel Keys provided critical logistical support that smoothed over some potentially tricky situations. Thanks also to Bruce Birchard for helping out during a remarkable one-week tour of Moscow.

At the manuscript stage, I received able assistance from Steve Chase and the entire South End Press collective. I would also like to thank the readers who took time out of their busy schedules to comment on individual chapters: John Bell, Matei Calinescu, Manuela Dobos, Adrienne Edgar, Andrew Feffer, Joanne Landy, Gerry O'Sullivan, David Ost, Vladimir Tismaneanu, and James Ward. The mistakes that have managed to survive such a thorough vetting process are mine and (unfortunately) mine alone. Since some of the material in this book made its first appearance in Z, Commonweal, New Politics, and Peace and Democracy, my thanks also go out to all of these publications for permission to use this material here.

-vii-

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