9
Ecology

Of all the political issues that relate to textiles, ecology stands out because it isn't just an issue but a set of very practical problems which textiles contributes to. Any understanding of the relationship between textiles and ecology must therefore alternate between political analysis and plain practicality. For textiles the link to ecology is that, through manufacture, it is one of the greatest industrial perpetrators of pollution; through fashion and style it participates in the most wasteful and profligate aspects of consumerism; through design and science it often fails to take responsibility and be a guardian of the planet. If textiles could easily retreat from these misdemeanours, it surely would have done so by now; the truth is that, as with all major problems, the issues are complex and the way forward not clear. Manufacture will, implicitly, always use the world's resources; textiles will always exact a price for companies, workers, people and the planet. The moral challenge will never disappear or be solved. It is not that kind of problem: it is not a war to be won but a situation to be managed.


Pollution, Politics and Ecology

The concept of pollution starts with our perception that there is a balance in nature. When catastrophic events occur, even natural ones like volcanic eruption, pollution can be a consequence and we consider that nature's balance has been disrupted. Pollution caused by people is nothing new: wherever there have been large centres of population, waste of all kinds has been a problem. For example, by the end of the first century BC, ancient Rome had approximately one million inhabitants, with all the waste-disposal problems that would entail. In more recent times industry's need for a workforce has caused ecological problems. In this respect the textile industry has been no different from any other:

New Bedford's population increased dramatically, from about 27,000 in 1880, when there were two mills, to about 121,000 in 1920 when there were 31 mills … increase in the population produced a dramatic increase in the amount of sewage … the local newspaper, Morning Mercury, reported …‘water thick with slime and shores covered with filth from the sewers’. (EPA, 2001)

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Textile Book
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Part I - Overviews *
  • 1 - What is Textiles? 3
  • 2 - The Culture Place of Textiles 7
  • 3 - Perceptions of Fabric 21
  • Part II - The Creative *
  • 4 - The Textile Designer 37
  • 5 - The Designer Maker 49
  • 6 - The Craftperson 63
  • 7 - The Textile Artist 77
  • Part III - The Social and Industrial Context *
  • 8 - Globel Textiles Tradition 91
  • 9 - Ecology 107
  • 10 - Industry 121
  • 11 - The Role of Trends and Forecasting 133
  • Part IV - Related Disciplines and Studies *
  • 12 - The Buyer 145
  • 13 - Journalism 157
  • 14 - Science 167
  • 15 - Research 179
  • Bibliography 191
  • Index 201
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 205

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.