13
Journalism

For the textile world journalists and journalism represent a key professional group and practice, providing exposure for products, dealing with industry issues and stimulating markets for textiles. Like most modern professions, journalism is experiencing considerable changes in how it is done, where it is done and by whom. Textiles journalism appears in a number of guises. There are specialist textile publications, which can generally be divided into contemporary, historical, craft and industrial categories. There are consumer magazines dealing with homes or fashion, areas also dealt with by television ‘magazine’ and lifestyle formats. Many of the examples cited will have an internet presence, and there is also an increasing number of web-based and internet ‘e-zines’ and news services. As well as the consumer and professional interest markets, there is a strong business information sector, both in print and video, which informs the public, shareholders and other journalists about company activities, performance and products. Most sizeable textile companies develop a public-relations wing especially to deal with press releases, creating or protecting company image, or dealing with media and public enquiries.


The Media Industry

Popular textile journalism is stimulated by the public desire for information and entertainment. Textiles are something everybody has to buy and the media and the shopping experience inform their choices. Where there is advanced consumerism, even the thought of spending money and possessing goods become entertainment and vicarious possession is almost as good as the real thing. It is worth remembering this, as - from the media industry point of view - it is the pictures and stories of textiles that make money, not the textiles themselves. The relationship between the textile industry and the media industry is therefore one of symbiosis. Magazines are probably the sector of the media industries that currently most influence textiles and this sector has seen tremendous growth during the last decade. In Britain during the 1990s, reader expenditure on magazines increased 64 per cent in real terms and advertising revenues increased by 30 per cent. Circulation increased by 67 million, indicating a 5 per cent growth and there was a 45 per cent increase in consumer titles. By the year 2000 the British business information

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The Textile Book
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Part I - Overviews *
  • 1 - What is Textiles? 3
  • 2 - The Culture Place of Textiles 7
  • 3 - Perceptions of Fabric 21
  • Part II - The Creative *
  • 4 - The Textile Designer 37
  • 5 - The Designer Maker 49
  • 6 - The Craftperson 63
  • 7 - The Textile Artist 77
  • Part III - The Social and Industrial Context *
  • 8 - Globel Textiles Tradition 91
  • 9 - Ecology 107
  • 10 - Industry 121
  • 11 - The Role of Trends and Forecasting 133
  • Part IV - Related Disciplines and Studies *
  • 12 - The Buyer 145
  • 13 - Journalism 157
  • 14 - Science 167
  • 15 - Research 179
  • Bibliography 191
  • Index 201
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