Hairstyles and Fashion: A Hairdresser's History of Paris, 1910-1920

By Steven Zdatny | Go to book overview

5
1914

January 1914: Blue, Green, Red and Violet Hair in
Demand in Paris

It need hardly be said that the leading hairdressing or rather pastiche establishments of Paris rely, like the great dressmaking concerns, upon continuous and radical changes in Fashion in order that they may cover their enormous general expenses and even make a little profit.

Grouped together in the form of a Fashion Cortmittee, the great Parisian coiffeurs have adopted the procedure of proposing that each season the change in hairdressing shall be a radical one, so that ladies may not be able to make use of the accessories of the previous season but be compelled to buy fresh ones. Still, it must be recognised that this stratagem, however ingenious it may be, is not always successful. Thus, two years ago it was proposed to cut ladies' hair and make it curl (or that curled postiche should be worn, which is the same thing). A few ladies were agreeable, but seeing the movement did not become general they abandoned it. Subsequently the Fashion Cortmittee brought out white powdered coiffures, which met with but a poor reception, last year (1913) from the beginning of October they caused mannequins to parade the theatres, dressed with false hair of blue, green, red, violet and other shades–that is to say, their hair matching the colour of their toilettes: their stockings, shoes, and even the make-up of their faces. The fashionable toilettes are now of these bright tints, called ‘Bulgarian colours.’

The inauguration of this fashion coincided precisely with the revival of a play called Kleopatre, wherein the principal personage wears blue hair, in accordance with the ancient Fjgyptian style, and it did not take the newspapers long to publish the news.


But is it pretty, is it befitting?

The dispute as to this point has lasted since the introduction of the fashion, and it does not sean as if it will finish. The last time that the bright-coloured mannequins presented themselves at the Cpera-Ccmique during a representation of ‘Madame Butterfly,’ the audience developed a touch of wry-neck

-95-

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Hairstyles and Fashion: A Hairdresser's History of Paris, 1910-1920
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - 1910 35
  • 2 - 1911 54
  • 3 - 1912 67
  • 4 - 1913 81
  • 5 - 1914 95
  • 6 - 1915 109
  • 7 - 1916 118
  • 8 - 1917 133
  • 9 - 1918 148
  • 10 - 1919 163
  • 11 - 1920 180
  • Index 197
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