Hairstyles and Fashion: A Hairdresser's History of Paris, 1910-1920

By Steven Zdatny | Go to book overview

7
1916

January 1916: The Work of the Trade Schools in
Influencing Fashion

In spite of the difficulties created by this long war, sore of the Trade schools of Paris have contrived to reorganise, and have even accomplished very creditable results. Amongst their number are the society schools, which are public, and others which are kept private, but which from, time to time give public seances.

Since the beginning of hostilities women have been adnitted everywhere, and they are particularly numerous. It was a young lady who scored the biggest success of the season at the cotpetition of the Academie des Ooiffeurs de France. The test set by Professor Nazaire was the following: ‘A transformable ncdem coiffure: obtainable with postiche as well as with the model's own hair.’

If I may be allowed to criticise I should say that the undulations obtained with the irons on the natural hair were generally stiffer than the waves obtained by the water process on the false hair. Still, there are reasons and excuses for this. It should not be forgotten that it was, after all, a students' competition - that is to say, a competition of beginners who certainly evinced more earnestness and good intention than skill and experience. With such fondness for their Trade as they have already shown, there is no doubt these students will rapidly acquire the ‘touch’ necessary to impart a softer appearance to the waves.

Another original competition took place publicly after the series of classes so courageously undertaken by our famous Ecole Parisienne de Coiffure, a glorious offspring of the Syndicat Cuvrier [the hairdressing workers' trade union]. The special competition did not take place between the students, but was an affair between the active professors of the school.

Impressed by an objection of the students - namely, that with the presentday fashions in low-fitting hats ladies dispense with the greater part of their false hair - the professors resolved to compete amongst themselves, and take the initiative in discovering a solution to the problem for the benefit of the Trade in general.

-118-

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Hairstyles and Fashion: A Hairdresser's History of Paris, 1910-1920
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - 1910 35
  • 2 - 1911 54
  • 3 - 1912 67
  • 4 - 1913 81
  • 5 - 1914 95
  • 6 - 1915 109
  • 7 - 1916 118
  • 8 - 1917 133
  • 9 - 1918 148
  • 10 - 1919 163
  • 11 - 1920 180
  • Index 197
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