Hairstyles and Fashion: A Hairdresser's History of Paris, 1910-1920

By Steven Zdatny | Go to book overview

8
1917

January 1917: The Evolution of the Perfumery Business

By decreeing that in the interests of the State evening dress can no longer be worn in theatres, the Government have struck a heavy blow at hairdressers who make a speciality of fancy hairdressing. However, prevailing circumstances do not permit me to go further into the subject at the present tine, and it must be postponed until a later date.

Another question of interest and importance at the moment is the recrudescence of activity amongst French chemists [i.e., pharmacies] in their attack on coiffeurs, perfurters and beauty specialists.

During the period intervening between the War of 1870 and the present War, the commerce in these products gradually extended until it attained almost incredible proportions. Indulgence in luxury increased beyond all bounds. Even coiffeurs de dames in a small way of business could easily dispose of cosmetics or perfumery costing 50 francs (£2) per box, and 100 francs (£4) for a small flagon. The flagons and boxes were made very artistically, often bore the signatures of renowned artistes, and were contained in dainty caskets that in turn were delicately enclosed in other protective coverings.

To-day, such articles are still exhibited in the windows of the best firms, but there is hardly any demand for them, and several of these caskets that I have seen offered for sale no longer bear their original beauty and freshness. The period of econcmy in France, voluntary or compulsory, has naturally revolutionised all businesses, including that of perfumery. But such catmerce will never really cease; like our own profession and any other which ministers to coquetterie and elegance, it is permanent and oontinuous. [But] it arranges itself to suit the exigencies of the period, and awaits more propitious times.

Taking into consideration the necessities of the moment, those innovators who are willing to take risks have a good chance of succeeding at the present time. Amongst their many attempts, I will mention one that has caused quite a sensation, as much amongst the public as amongst hairdressers.

-133-

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Hairstyles and Fashion: A Hairdresser's History of Paris, 1910-1920
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - 1910 35
  • 2 - 1911 54
  • 3 - 1912 67
  • 4 - 1913 81
  • 5 - 1914 95
  • 6 - 1915 109
  • 7 - 1916 118
  • 8 - 1917 133
  • 9 - 1918 148
  • 10 - 1919 163
  • 11 - 1920 180
  • Index 197
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