Hairstyles and Fashion: A Hairdresser's History of Paris, 1910-1920

By Steven Zdatny | Go to book overview

9
1918

January 1918: Fashion in the Hairdressing Schools for
the Wounded Victims of the War

Since it is usual at the comencenent of the year to express one's good wishes, let us in the first place have a kind thought for those who have nobly borne their part rnLlitarily in the defence of their country, whilst we professionally have safeguarded the interests of the Trade to which we mutually belong, let us take steps to ensure that when our confreres return after the cessation of hostilities, they will not have to tear fresh hardships where it is possible for them to resume their ordinary work or their customary business affairs. Cur efforts, collective and individual, can greatly assist in the acratplishtent of this purpose; let us therefore at once make all the efforts to this end that are within our power, each within our particular sphere. The economists teach us that it is not alone by personal carefulness and self-denial that we shall help to restore prosperity after the war, but chiefly by work and by production.

Independent of the Trade schools and associations, and of the private academies, there have already been formed in Paris two schools which are reserved for the wounded and for the widows of the war. A third is in process of formation, and more are likely to follow. Some hundreds of maimed soldiers, formerly belonging to every imaginable vocation, have been able to learn in these special schools to shave, cut hair, wave, dress ladies' hair, dye, make postiche, and do other hair work, each according to his particular infirmity and ability. A number are already established on their own account, whilst others have been engaged as employees by various houses. All are gaining a livelihood in their new calling. Others, again, are continuing to perfect themselves in the various branches of the profession. Nothing is wanting in these schools in material, appliances, teachers or benevolent patrons. In fact, everything and everybody necessary have been at the disposal of the students from morning till night and every day during the past two years.

[Among these pupils I saw] two different classes of hairdressing - the ‘coiffeur’ style and the ‘public’ style. The first is generally that of the new

-148-

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Hairstyles and Fashion: A Hairdresser's History of Paris, 1910-1920
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - 1910 35
  • 2 - 1911 54
  • 3 - 1912 67
  • 4 - 1913 81
  • 5 - 1914 95
  • 6 - 1915 109
  • 7 - 1916 118
  • 8 - 1917 133
  • 9 - 1918 148
  • 10 - 1919 163
  • 11 - 1920 180
  • Index 197
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