Hairstyles and Fashion: A Hairdresser's History of Paris, 1910-1920

By Steven Zdatny | Go to book overview

10
1919

January 1919: For the Victory Galas

The Great Victory will be followed by many grand receptions and galas, for which extensive preparations are being made in Paris. In fact, the official receptions have already commenced, and certain dressmaking and hairdressing firms have benefited financially from them; but these houses, which are very well known and restricted in number, are almost entirely noted for the brilliance and lavish character of their productions. Such work is certainly profitable to the privileged circle who monopolise it, but it possesses only a passing interest for the great bulk of the public who, being usually younger, prefer novelty and originality.

The older and classical styles, which are those of the official world, have therefore little interest for the generality of coiffeurs, and especially for the bold, enterprising innovators, whose essential object must be to give satisfaction to the numerous devotees of Fashion - the young and very modem ladies of elegance whom the men of wealth dote over. like the high-spirited horse that is fed on the best oats and which impatiently paws the earth when deprived of freedom, a large number of these elegant females, whom the sorrows of the war have not touched, have generated during the long period of restrictions an absorbing desire for show, amusement and pleasure. The greater portion of them, it is true, have never missed any opportunity which offered for giving full scope to their coquetterie, but they have exercised a certain restraint out of regard for general opinion. Henceforth they will be less inclined to recognise any such reserve and the happier conditions which now prevail will relieve them of any necessity for it. They can expend money and amuse themselves extravagantly in broad daylight.

In order to aoVninister to their caprices the industries de luxe are working at high pressure. There is a veritable furore amongst the specialist costumiers in the production of the prettiest robes for evening wear; and in the same way great demand is being made on the coiffeurs and posticheurs who have built up reputations for taste and new ideas.

The artist posticheurs are successful because they make it possible and easy to transform very rapidly, and always to embellish the feminine head

-163-

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Hairstyles and Fashion: A Hairdresser's History of Paris, 1910-1920
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - 1910 35
  • 2 - 1911 54
  • 3 - 1912 67
  • 4 - 1913 81
  • 5 - 1914 95
  • 6 - 1915 109
  • 7 - 1916 118
  • 8 - 1917 133
  • 9 - 1918 148
  • 10 - 1919 163
  • 11 - 1920 180
  • Index 197
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