Eating out in Europe: Picnics, Gourmet Dining, and Snacks since the Late Eighteenth Century

By Marc Jacobs; Peter Scholliers | Go to book overview

Eating Out in Europe
Picnics, Gourmet Dining and Snacks
since the Late Eighteenth Century

Edited by
Marc Jacobs and Peter Scholliers

Under the Auspices of the
International Commission for Research into
European Food History

Oxford • New York

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Eating out in Europe: Picnics, Gourmet Dining, and Snacks since the Late Eighteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables ix
  • List of Figures xi
  • Preface and Acknowledgements xiii
  • 1 - Conviviality, Custom(er)s and Public Places of New Taste since the Late Eighteenth Century 1
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Part 1 - Customs in Common 17
  • Meals in the Open Air 19
  • 2 - Eating in the Open Air in England, 1830–1914 21
  • Notes 34
  • References *
  • 3 - Endogenous Developments in Scottish Harvest Food 39
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 4 - Changing Eating Habits of Country Folk in Hungary, 1760–1960 53
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Up, Down and (drinking and Eating) out 69
  • 5 - Dining Cultures in Early-Modern Inns 71
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 6 - The Public House and Its Social Perception in Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century Switzerland 89
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 7 - The Development of a Beer-Drinking Culture in a Traditional Wine-Producing Area (meran, South Tyrol) 105
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 8 - Food Culture in Slovene Urban Inns and Restaurants between the End of the Nineteenth Century and World War II 125
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Customs of Continuity and Change 137
  • 9 - A Social Event Involving Food: Both a Necessity and a Form of Entertainment 139
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 10 - How to Wine and Dine (as a Group) for Free 161
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 11 - The Rise of Restaurants in Norway in the Twentieth Century 179
  • Notes 191
  • Reference *
  • Part II - New Places, Choices and Tastes 195
  • Getting Hold of Gastronomy - Languages of Taste 197
  • 12 - The French Novel and Luxury Eating in the Nineteenth Century 199
  • Notes 211
  • Bibliography 212
  • 13 - Towards a History of Cooks in France in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 215
  • Notes *
  • Reference *
  • 14 - Evidence from the Good Food Guide 229
  • Notes *
  • Reference *
  • 15 - Eating in the Public Sphere in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 245
  • Notes 258
  • Reference 259
  • Creating Semi-Public Places of Endless Choice - Restaurants of All Types 261
  • 16 - A Preamble 263
  • Notes 276
  • Reference *
  • 17 - The Rising Popularity of Dining out in German Restaurants in the Aftermath of Modern Urbanization 281
  • Notes *
  • Reference *
  • 18 - Eating without Effort: the Rise of the Fast-Food Industry in Twentieth-Century Britain 301
  • Notes 312
  • Reference 314
  • 19 - Snacks and Snack Culture in the Rise of Eating out in the Netherlands in the Twentieth Century 317
  • Notes *
  • Reference *
  • Diffusing Public Places of Discipline: Canteens and Cafeterias 335
  • 20 - Consumption and Working Habits among Urban Eabourers in France in the Second Half of the Nineteenth Century 337
  • Notes 346
  • Reference 348
  • 21 - Industrial Canteens in Germany, 1850–1950 351
  • Notes *
  • Reference *
  • 22 - An Anthropological Analysis of the Dynamics and Issues Involved in Implementing Public Policy, 1970–2001 373
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Notes on Contributors 389
  • Name Index 397
  • Place Index 401
  • Food and Drink Index 405
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