The American Language: An Inquiry into the Development of English in the United States

By H. L. Mencken | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

[A few duplications will be found here. I have thought it better to make them than to use cross-references. In three or four cases works listed are marked "not published." I have examined all of these; they will be published later on.]


1.
GENERAL

A. F. L.: English As She Is Spoke, Baltimore Evening Sun, Nov. 18, 1920.

Aldington, Richard: English and American, Poetry, May, 1920.

Alford, Henry: A Plea for the Queen's English; London, 1863.

Allen, Grant: Americanisms (in Chambers' Encyclopædia, new ed.; Phila., 1906, vol. i).

Anon.: American English (in America From a French Point of View; London, 1897).

—: Art. Americanisms, Everyman Encyclopædia, ed. by Andrew Boyle; Lon- don, n. d.

—: Art. Americanisms, New International Encyclopædia, 2nd ed., ed. by F. M. Colby and Talcott Williams; New York, 1917.

—: Americanisms, a Study of Words and Manners, Southern Review, vol. ix, p. 290 and p. 529.

—: Americanisms, Academy, March 2, 1889.

—: Americanisms, Southern Literary Messenger, Oct., 1848.

—: British Struggles With Our Speech, Literary Digest, June 19, 1915.

—: I Speak United States, Saturday Review, Sept. 22, 1894.

—: Our Strange New Language, Literary Digest, Sept. 16, 1916.

—: Progress of Refinement, New York Organ, May 29, 1847.

—: Some So-called Americanisms, All the Year Round, vol. lxxvi, p. 38.

—: The American English, Critic, vol. xiii, p. 115.

—: The American Language, Putnam's Magazine, Nov., 1870.

—: The Great American Language, Cornhill Magazine, vol. lviii, p. 363.

—: They Spake With Diverse Tongues, Atlantic Monthly, July, 1909.

—: To Teach the American Tongue in Britain, Literary Digest, Aug. 9, 1913.

—: Triumphant Americanisms, New York Evening Post, June 11, 1921.

Archer, William: America and the English Language, Pall Mall Magazine, Oct., 1898.

—: The American Language (in America To-day; New York, 1899).

Ayres, Harry Morgan: The English Language in America (in The Cambridge History of American Literature; New York, 1921, vol. iv).

Bache, Richard Meade: Vulgarisms and Other Errors of Speech, 2nd ed.; Phila., 1869.

Baker, Franklin T.: The Vernacular (in Munro's Principles of Secondary Educa- tion ; New York, 1915, ch. ix).

-427-

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The American Language: An Inquiry into the Development of English in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The American Language - An Inquiry into the Development of English in the United States *
  • Contents iii
  • Preface to the First Edition *
  • Preface to the Revised Edition xi
  • I - Introductory *
  • II - The Beginnings of American 45
  • III - The Period of Growth 74
  • IV - American and English Today *
  • V - International Exchanges 157
  • VI - Tendencies in American 173
  • VII - The Standard American Pronunciation 206
  • VIII - American Spelling 221
  • IX - The Common Speech 255
  • X - Proper Names in America 321
  • XI - American Slang 360
  • XII - The Future of the Language 372
  • Appendix 388
  • I - Specimens of the American Vulgate 388
  • II - Non-English Dialects in America 397
  • III - Proverb and Platitude 422
  • Bibliography 427
  • List of Words and Phrases 459
  • Index 483
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