Goblin Market, The Prince's Progress and Other Poems

By Christina Rossetti | Go to book overview

GOBLIN MARKET
THE PRINCE'S PROGRESS
AND OTHER POEMS

BY
CHRISTINA ROSSETTI

HUMPHREY MILFORD
OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS
LONDON, EDINBURGH, GLASGOW
NEW YORK, TORONTO, MELBOURNE & BOMBAY

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Goblin Market, The Prince's Progress and Other Poems
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Goblin Market, The Prince's Progress and Other Poems *
  • Contents *
  • Goblin Market, and Other Poems, 1862 *
  • Goblin Market *
  • In the Round Tower at Jhansi - June 8, 1857 21
  • Dream Land 22
  • At Home 23
  • A Triad 24
  • Love from the North 25
  • Winter Rain 26
  • Cousin Kate 28
  • Noble Sisters 30
  • Spring 32
  • The Lambs of Grasmere, 1860 34
  • A Birthday 35
  • Remember 36
  • After Death 36
  • An End 37
  • My Dream 38
  • Song 40
  • The Hour and the Ghost 40
  • A Summer Wish 43
  • An Apple Gathering 44
  • Song 45
  • Maude Clare 46
  • Echo 48
  • My Secret 48
  • Another Spring 50
  • A Peal of Bells 51
  • Fata Morgana 52
  • ' No, Thank You, John ' 52
  • May 54
  • A Pause of Thought 54
  • Twilight Calm 55
  • Wife to Husband 58
  • Three Seasons 59
  • Mirage 60
  • Shut out 60
  • Sound Sleep 62
  • Song 63
  • Song 63
  • Dead before Death 64
  • Bitter for Sweet 65
  • Sister Maude 65
  • Rest 66
  • The First Spring Day 67
  • The Convent Threshold 67
  • Up-Hill 73
  • Devotional Pieces 74
  • ' the Love of Christ Which Passeth Knowledge' 74
  • A Bruised Reed Shall He Not Break ' 75
  • A Better Resurrection 76
  • Advent 77
  • The Three Enemies 79
  • The One Certainty 82
  • Christian and Jew 82
  • Sweet Death 85
  • Symbols 86
  • 'Consider the Lilies of the Field' 87
  • The World 88
  • A Testimony 89
  • From House to Home 95
  • Old and New Year Ditties 105
  • Amen 107
  • The Prince's Progress, and Other Poems, 1866 *
  • The Prince's Progress *
  • Maiden-Song 129
  • Jessie Cameron 137
  • Spring Quiet 141
  • The Poor Ghost 142
  • A Portrait 144
  • Dream-Love 145
  • Twice 147
  • Songs in a Cornfield 149
  • A Year's Windfalls 154
  • The Queen of Hearts 157
  • One Day 159
  • A Bird's-Eye View 160
  • Light Love 163
  • A Dream 166
  • A Ring Posy 166
  • Beauty is Vain 167
  • Lady Maggie 168
  • What Would I Give ? 170
  • The Bourne 171
  • Summer 171
  • Autumn 172
  • The Ghost's Petition 175
  • Memory 178
  • A Royal Princess 180
  • Shall I Forget? 187
  • Vanity of Vanities 187
  • L. E. L 188
  • Life and Death 190
  • Bird or Beast ? 190
  • Eve 191
  • Grown and Flown 194
  • A Farm Walk 195
  • Somewhere or Other 197
  • A Chill 198
  • Child's Talk in April 199
  • Gone for Ever 200
  • Under the Rose 201
  • Devotional Pieces *
  • Long Barren 223
  • If Only 224
  • Dost Thou Not Care ? 224
  • Weary in Well-Doing 225
  • Martyrs' Song 226
  • After This the Judgement 228
  • Good Friday 231
  • The Lowest Place 231
  • Miscellaneous Poems, 1848-69 *
  • Heart's Chill between 233
  • Repining 235
  • Sit Down in the Lowest Room 245
  • My Friend 256
  • Last Night 257
  • Consider 259
  • Helen Grey 260
  • By the Waters of Babylon 261
  • Seasons 264
  • Mother Country 265
  • A Smile and a Sigh 268
  • Dead Hope 268
  • Autumn Violets 269
  • ' They Desire a Better Country' 270
  • The Offering of the New Law, the One Oblation Once Offered 272
  • Conference between Christ, the Saints, and the Soul 273
  • Come Unto Me 275
  • Jesus, Do I Love Thee ? 276
  • I Know You Not 277
  • ' Before the Paling of the Stars' 279
  • Easter Even 280
  • Paradise : in a Dream 281
  • Within the Veil 283
  • Paradise : in a Symbol 284
  • Amor Mundi 285
  • Who Shall Deliver Me ? 287
  • If 288
  • Twilight Night 289
  • Index of Titles *
  • Index of First Lines *
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