A Social History of Anthropology in the United States

By Thomas C. Patterson | Go to book overview

Notes
1
Pickering's call for a “general ethnography of the globe” was underpinned by The Wilkes Exploring Expedition, 1838–1842, which made stops in South America, Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, Fiji, Tonga, Tahiti, and the Pacific Coast of North America. The organization and accomplishments of the expedition are discussed in Barry A. Joyce's (2001) The Shaping of American Ethnography.
2
In the 1850s, Stephens's effort to purchase Palenque and remove it to the United States raised interest in London. “The British Museum through the British government stirred the British consul in Guatemala. Something had to be done about purchasing a great Maya city for the British Museum,” and the consul sent two German scientists to report on the ruins at Quiriguá (Blom 1936:1).
3
Morgan's Ancient Society attracted the attention of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels. Marx (1880–2/1974:95–242) took copious notes on the book between 1880 and 1882. Engels (1884/1972:236–7) concluded his Origin of the Family, Private Property, and State with Morgan's judgment of civilization found in the quotation cited above. While Marx and Engels viewed Morgan as an authority on the ethnology of primitive peoples, other features of Morgan's work attracted their attention as well: his emphasis on the relation between technological innovations and new economic relations, his discussion of communal or collective relations in primitive societies, his analysis of the emergence of private property and the state, his notion of dialectical return found in the last sentence of the quotation, and his awareness of how primitive social relations are dissolved and reconstituted in civilized societies (e.g. Krader 1974).

-34-

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A Social History of Anthropology in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Anthropology in the New Republic, 1776–1879 7
  • Notes 34
  • 2 - Anthropology in the Liberal Age, 1879–1929 35
  • Notes 66
  • 3 - Anthropology and the Search for Social Order 1929–1945 71
  • Notes *
  • 4 - Anthropology in the Postwar Era, 1945–1973 103
  • Notes *
  • 5 - Anthropology in the Neoliberal Era, 1974–2000 135
  • Notes *
  • Bibliography 165
  • Index 207
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