CHAPTER II
ENTER MUSSOLINI

When World War One broke out in the summer of 1914, Benito Mussolini was an anti-patriotic revolutionary Socialist, and chief editor of the daily newspaper Avanti, official organ of the Italian Socialist Party. During the months of July, August, and September 1914, he maintained, in accordance with Marxist doctrine, that war must be stopped by social revolution. To stir up the proletariat in Italy against war, he exploited the general feeling of hostility against Austria and Germany while there was any danger that the Italian Government would decide to intervene on their side. But his target was moribund capitalistic society. He shared Lenin's attitude: the "proletariat" should not allow itself to become involved in the war; instead of being led astray by the so-called "defence of the father- land", it should push itself like a wedge into the "crisis of capitalistic society" and promote social revolution.

On August 13, he wrote:

"In time of war the bourgeoisie confronts the proletariat with the tragic dilemma: either insurrection, easily drowned in blood, or cooperation in joint butchery. This second alternative of the dilemma is cloaked under words of Fatherland, duty, territorial integrity, etc. Yet the root of the matter never changes. Here is the real reason why we hate war."

On August 16:

"We mean to remain scrupulously faithful to our Socialist and Internationalistic doctrine. Though the storm may assail us, it will not shatter our faith."

The conclusion was always the same. Italy must remain neutral. If the Government tried to pass from neutrality to war, whether against the Central Powers or against the Triple Entente, the pro etariat was to unleash social revolution. He filled his newspaper with protests, accusations, and threats against the Italian Government, against the "German hordes" ( August 5, 1915), against British and French imperialism, against Belgium, against the whole world. He had the following to say about Belgium on September 8, 1914:

"They ask us to shed tears over the martyrdom or Belgium. This is but a sentimental comedy staged by France and Belgium. These two harridans would like to exploit universal gullibility. To us, Belgium is a belligerent country, no different from all others. We do not see why we ought to adopt special views in her regard. It is our right and duty to urge the revolt of the working classes against today's events."

-29-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Prelude to World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 519

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.