CHAPTER XIV
THE MANCHURIAN CRISIS

In August 1931, Ramsay MacDonald broke away from the Labour Party and with a handful of followers joined up with the Conservative Party and the majority of the Liberals to form a "National Government", of which he was the figurehead, while the power behind the throne was Stanley Baldwin, leader of the Conservative Party.

The election of the following October gave an overwhelming victory to the newborn Coalition. In November 1931, Sir John Simon, a former Liberal, became Foreign Secretary.

From 1906 to 1914 the British Conservative Party had been out of power. Then from 1914 to 1922 it had been in coalition with the Liberals. From 1922 to 1929 its majority in the House was not large enough to permit of a rectilinear policy. After the elections of 1931, the MacDonald—Baldwin Cabinet had an enormous Conservative majority. The traditional British policy of the balance of power could now be carried on unhampered.1

This policy might have kept peace in the world had the British Tories not made two serious miscalculations as to who was the stronger and who was the weaker. In the Far East they thought that Russia was the stronger; so they sided with Japan. In Europe they thought that France was the stronger; so they sided with Germany.

A few days after the "National" Government was formed in Britain, Japanese troops began invading Manchuria, north of Mukden, and soon bombed and occupied that city. By this action the Japanese violated not only the Covenant of the League of Nations, but also the Nine-Power Treaty of 1922 concerning China, and the Kellogg Pact.

Stimson, the American Secretary of State at the time, wrote in his diary that if the military party in Japan had its way, "the damage to the new structure of international society provided by the post-war

____________________
1
Cf. Churchill, The Gathering Storm, pp. 207-10:

"For four hundred years the foreign policy of England has been to oppose the strongest, most aggressive, most dominanting Power on the continent, and particularly to prevent the Low Countries falling into the hands of such a Power. . . . The question is not whether it is Spain, or the French Monarchy, or the French Empire, or the German Empire, or the Hitler régime. It has nothing to do with rulers or nations; it is concerned solely with whoever is the strongest or the potentially dominanting tyrant(?). Therefore, we should not be afraid of being accused of being pro-French or anti-German. If the circumstances were reserved, we could equally be pro-German and anti-French."

-123-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Prelude to World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 519

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.