Competitive Spirits: Latin America's New Religious Economy

By R. Andrew Chesnut | Go to book overview

5
Entrepreneurial Spirits
Religions of the African Diaspora

Joining Pentecostalism and Charismatic Catholicism in dominating Latin America's new spiritual marketplace is the region's third major pneumacentric religious tradition, the faiths of the African diaspora. Over the past half-century, the religions that African slaves brought over to the Americas as part of their cultural baggage have been thriving in Brazil and much of the Caribbean. In Brazil, Umbanda and Candomblé, the two principal African-derived religions, successfully compete with pneumacentric Christianity for the loyalty of urban spiritual consumers. In the Caribbean, Vodou forms an integral part of the Haitian cultural fabric, much as Catholicism has done historically in IberoAmerica. 1 Indeed, it was Vodou that inspired and sustained the slave revolt that culminated in Haitian independence and the world's first black republic in 1804. Santería did not play the same revolutionary role in Cuba, but it has allowed African-Cubans to maintain their African cultural roots and derive spiritual succor and power from West African orishas, or spirits. Accompanying their human devotees, the orishas of Santería have followed Cuban santeros to their diasporan communities in Miami and New York, among other U.S. cities.

While the diasporan faiths exhibit diversity in their belief systems and practices, core elements of ritual and creed unite them sufficiently to permit some general comments. Origins in West and Central Africa, spirit possession, polytheism, animal sacrifice, syncretism with Catholicism, and a history of slavery and racism stand out as the salient elements that unite Candomblé, Santería, Umbanda, Vodou, and other smaller regional groups in doctrine and worship. Some general introductory remarks on each aspect will lead into a full examina-

-102-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Competitive Spirits: Latin America's New Religious Economy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents *
  • Competitive Spirits *
  • 1 - The New Temples of Religious Pluralism 3
  • 2 - Four Centuries of Religious Monopoly 17
  • 3 - An Anatomy of Pentecostal Success 39
  • 4 - The Catholic Charismatic Renewal 64
  • 5 - Religions of the African Diaspora 102
  • 6 - The Success of Pneumacentric Religion among Women 128
  • 7 - Ex Uno Plura (out of One, Many) 147
  • Notes 161
  • References 165
  • Index 171
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 189

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.